4 th meeting: cuisine

Our 4th meeting was at the 15th of November. We told about traditional food:)

The body of Czech meals typically consists of two or more courses; the first course is traditionally soup, the second course is the main dish, and the third course can include supplementary courses, such as dessert or  compote. In Czech cuisine, thick soups and many kinds of sauces, both based on stewed or cooked vegetables and meats, often with cream, as well as baked meats with natural sauces, are popular dishes.

Also Czech Republic is famous because of its beer. Beer has a long history in what is now the Czech Republic, with brewing taking place in Břevnov Monastery in 993. The city of Brno had the right to brew beer from the 12th century while Plzeň and České Budějovice, Pilsen and Budweis in German, had breweries in the 13th century.

So, Jenny told us about Hong Kong cuisine. This cuisine is totally different.

At least 98% of the residents in Hong Kong are Chinese, either Cantonese, Teochew, Hakka, or Shanghainese.

Many enjoy a traditional breakfast that includes congee (rice porridge) and yau cha kwai (oil fried bread sticks). However, western breakfasts that include bread, sausage, pancakes, and eggs are becoming more popular.

For mid-day and evening meals, most people serve Chinese food with rice in their homes. Some of the most common ingredients used in Cantonese cuisines include shiitake mushrooms, Chinese cabbage, salted duck eggs, kai-lan, red beans, dried shrimp, hoisin sauce, dried scallops, jujube, and lotus seeds.

Steamed shrimp dumplingsPhoenix talons

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