Monthly Archives: April 2018

Särkän Märkä 2018. Final post

Our last post is about the amusement park. Everything seemed to indicate that it was going to be an afternoon with a sad sky and a rainy day. But in the end the sun came out and we had an amazing afternoon.

I am very happy to have met Viivi and Vera, I think I could not have had better partners, who coincided so much with me in thoughts and way of being. I’m really going to miss them.

I’ll see you before I go home, and I also hope to see you next year, this time in a Mediterranean country!

FINNISH ENGLISH SPANISH
Käänny oikeallë Turn right Gira a la derecha
Käänny vasemmalle Turn left Gira a la izquierda
Mene suoraan Go straight Sigue recto
Mene takaisin Go back Vuelve atrás
Ylitä silta Cross the bridge Cruza el puente
Satama Port Puerto
Lentokenttä Airport Aeropuerto
Moottoritte Highway Autopista
Saapuvat Arrivals Llegadas
Lähtevät Departures Salidas
Vene Boat Barco
Lentokone Plane Avión
Kaivinkone Crane Grúa

 

BOARD GAMES TAVERNA

Personally, I love board games, I spent all my Christmas at my brother’s house playing them and I can say that I am an expert strategist. This was a very fun afternoon and we talked about things in our lives which I do not know if they can be said in public, because they were very personal and I am very happy to have shared these moments with them.

We also spend much of the afternoon talking about what we will do when they visit me in Spain, because I’m sure sooner or later they will come to see me and enjoy the real sun and they will hate the heat as much as I do (although they will love the low prices)

 

FINNISH ENGLISH SPANISH
Yksi One Uno
Kaksi Two Dos
Kolme Three Tres
Nelja Four Cuatro
Viisi Five Cinco
Kuusi Six Seis
Seitsemän Seven Siete
Kahdeksan Eight Ocho
Yhdeksän Nine Nueve
Kymmenen Ten Diez
Yksitoista Eleven Once
Kaksitoista Twelve Doce
Kolmentoista Thirteen Trece
Neljiatoista Fourteen Catorce
Viisitoista Fiveteen Quince
Kuusitoista Sixteen Dieciséis
Seitsmäntoista Seventeen Diecisiete
Kahdeksantoista Eitghteen Dieciocho
Yhdeksäntoista Nineteen Diecinueve
Kaksikymmenta Twenty Veinte

 

THE BULL

For our seventh meeting we were at The Bull restaurant, finding an hour that suited us was a bit complicated and, in fact, the time was a problem. So we were at five in the afternoon, what I did not know is that Vera and Viivi were going to dinner and I was just going to have a coffee, in the end I ended up having dinner with them at five in the afternoon, unthinkable in a Spanish schedule. I could say that I had a perfect cultural investment.

After leaving the restaurant we moved to Sokos where we spent an afternoon with laughter, coffee and gossip.

FIINISH ENGLISH SPANISH
Kylmä Cold Frío
Pipo Beanie Gorro
Hattu Hat Sombrero
T-Paita T-shirt Camiseta
Paita Shirt Camisa
Hanskat Gloves Guantes
Lapaset Mittens Manoplas
Housut Pants Pantanlón
Farkut Jeans Vaqueros
Kengät Shoes Zapatos
Saappaat Boots Botas
Tyhmä kuin vasemman jalan saapas Dump as a left leg boot Tan tonto como una bota izquierda
Takki Jacket Chaqueta
Neule Sweater Chaleco
Takki Coat Abrigo
Toppi Top Top

OMELETTE IMPROVED

Bearing in mind the fateful result of our first attempt at a Spanish omelette at Vera’s house, I decided that I could not leave Finland and that my Finnish friends did not taste an omelet with potatoes.

So for the eighth meeting I invited them to my residence and I cooked them an omelette, this time successful.

These are some sayings and phrases (and some vocabulary word that came up)

  1. Takatalvi – Winter is back (when you think is already gone) – Vuelve el invierno
  2. Koputa puuta – Knock the wood (touch) – tocar madera
  3. Painaa kuin synti – weight like a sin – pesa como un pecado
  4. Menneen talven lumia(it’s snow from the past Winter) – water under the bridge – Pasado pisado.
  5. Kadota kuin piera Saharaan – It disappeared like a fart in the Sahara – Ha desaparecido como un pedo en el Sáhara.
  6. Keskustori – Central market/place – Plaza/Mercado central
  7. Särkäniemi Huvipuisto – ammusement park – parque de atracciones.
  8. Ryyppyy / huikka – big sip / small sip – Tomar un sorbo grande / pequeño
  9. Bussiasema – Bus station – Estación de autobuses
  10. Vessapaperi – Toilet paper –Papel higiénico.

HAPPY NEW YEAR!!

Our sixth meeting took place at Wayne’s Coffee. It was the first time that we saw each other after Christmas, the three of us were talking about our family visits and the time of relaxation that we had the opportunity to have.

Later there was the theme that there was going to be a party at the Union club with the theme of the 80s, at first only I was going to attend, but with a little work Viivi and I convinced Vera to go and have a good time , enjoying the full Erasmus experience.

FINNISH ENGLISH SPANISH
Oranssi Orange Naranja
Keltainen Yellow Amarillo
Sininen Blue Azul
Vaaleanpunainen Pink Rosa
Pinkki Light pink (pale) Rosa palo
Vihreä Green Verde
Punainen Red Rojo
Harmaa Gris Gris
Musta Negro Negro
Valkoinen White Blanco
Violetti Purple Morado
Ruskea Brown Marrón
Persiklaa Peach Melocotón

Lunch in tamk

For our fifth meeting we thought that what better place to meet than the building where we spent most of our time attending (to different) classes.

This was totally snowy and at least I was very excited about it, because in my home town there is never snow. This is what we learned in this meeting:

FINNISH ENGLISH SPANISH
Lumi Snow Nieve
En puhu suomea I don’t speake finnish No hablo finés
Lumisota Snow fight Guerra de nieve
Maksan kortilla I’m paying with card Voy a pagar con tarjeta
Käteisellä With cash En efectivo
Missä on…? Where is…¿ Donde esta?
Miten voit¿
mitä kuuluu?Miten Menee?
Hoy are you?
hoy’s going
how you doing
Que tal?

 

Paljonko maksaa? How much ccost..? Cuanto cuesta
Paljonko kello on? What time is it Que hora es
Juoruilla Gossip cotilleo

8th meeting – clothing

Ignasi has a Finnish exam coming up, and he wanted to learn some clothing related vocabulary for it. I taught him some in Finnish, and he taught me some in Spanish. I must say I only remembered one word from before, which was zapatos (shoes). Some of the words he taught me I did remember after being told what it was, such as:  pantalones (pants), falda (skirt), camisa (shirt), chaqueta (jacket), sombrero (hat, and yes, any kind of a hat).

Some completely new words I learned:
Hoodie – sudadera
Belt – cinturón
Jeans – tejanos
Scarf – bufanda
Gloves – guantes

I also learned the word bambas (trainers), which apparently is a strongly regional word. For most of Spain, bambas means the slippers you would wear at home, not trainers, but Ignasi swore that bambas is definitely the superior word for trainers.

I also taught him the words farkut and takki, and asked if he could figure out what a jean jacket would be. He guessed farkkutakki quickly enough! I tried the same in Spanish with less success. Jean jacket in Spanish is chaqueta tejana (not tejano chaqueta like I thought). I keep forgetting the describing words always go after the noun, and the gender was hard as well.

Meeting 4: The longest words

We splitted the fourth meeting into two because Monji was only able to meet on Thursday and Alisa only on Friday. For me both days were okay, so I first met Monji in TAMKO’s office where he told me that his Erasmus year is already ending in May. We talked about his future plans, he hopes that he can find a job in Germany before his Visa is running out and I think that based on his German skills he might have a chance.

The next day Alisa and I met again in the Tribe Tampere space where this time we were welcomed by a big fluffy dog!

After stroking him extensively we started to practice some Finnish and German. I tried to tell her from when to when I am going on holidays, but talking about dates in Finnish is still very hard for me.

 

I am in France until the 20th of August = Olen Ranskassa kahdeskymmenes elokuuta asti

Then we compared the longest words of our languages – and discovered that there is not much difference!

The longest Finnish word:

lentokonesuihkuturbiinimoottoriapumekaanikkoaliupseerioppilas (61 letters)

The longest German word:

Grund­stücks­ver­kehrs­ge­neh­mi­gungs­zu­stän­dig­keits­über­tra­gungs­ver­ord­nung (67 letters)

And of course, there exist a lot more ridiculously long words in both languages, for example epäjärjestelmällisyydestäänköhän and Rindfleischetikettierungsüberwachungsaufgabenübertragungsgesetz.

 

Julia’s vocabulary:

a dog ein Hund koira
cute süß söpö
paw eine Pfote tassu
to stroke streicheln silittää

 

 

Meeting 3: Finnish private space

For our third meeting Monji suggested to go to the community space of Tribe Tampere, a nice working space with a kitchen, meeting rooms and a small stage. I didn’t know about the existence of this place before, but I was positively surprised.

The funniest things we saw in there were those cabinets which are equipped with a chair, small table and electric socket. There is just enough space for one person and it is pretty quiet when the door is closed – a dream for Finns!

 

We all took a cup of tea and sat down on a sofa and then just talked a bit and revised some grammar from last time. Eastern was coming soon so we told each other about our plans for the Easter weekend and learned some vocabulary.

 

Julia’s vocabulary:

Easter Ostern pääsiäinen
Easter Bunny Osterhase (m.) pääsiäispupu
Easter egg Osterei (n.) pääsiäismuna
Happy Easter! Frohe Ostern! Hyvää pääsiäistä!
spring Frühling (m.) kevät
flower Blume (f.) kukka

 

 

Meeting 2: This grammar!

For our second meeting Alisa, Monji and I met at TAMK as it was the most convenient place because of our different schedules. During this session we practiced the German modal verbs which Alisa just learned in the German class.  At the same time, I could also revise these verbs in Finnish, whereby I have to admit that it is way easier in Finnish than in German because there are no irregularities in the conjugation and the sentence structure stays pretty much the same.

The structure of sentences was the next problem we were facing on this day. It seems like every word you add to a German sentence changes the whole order of the rest of the words. But after a while of translating various sentences, Alisa and Monji realized that if there are two verbs in one sentence, the second verb stands always at the end. And there are actually clear grammatical structures:

Julia’s vocabulary:

     
be allowed to dürfen saada
be able to; can können osata
have to; must müssen täytyä
be supposed to sollen pitää
want to wollen haluta
like to mögen tykätä