Tag Archives: Alphabet

Firts meeting

We met at the TAMK´s library at our first meeting. First thing we would do, was plan our future meeting´s and expectation´s. Mirwaisi knows finish much more than I know Persia. So, he has to start for the basic´s whit me. While my teaching is more about conversation and correcingt his grammar.



First Mirwaisi taught with me Persian alphabets. We star learning by turning my name Anna to Persian alphabets. And some other words e.g. my daughter’s name Maija and Afganistan, which is Mirwaisi´s home country. I learn about that there are as much Persian speaking people as German speakers. So the language area is quite big. I learn also that people in Afganistan speak Dari and the Tadžikistan´s speak tadžik and the Iranians speak Persia, but they all understand each other’s. In the end Mirwaisi shows me some internet links where I can discover more about the language.



At the end we talk in finish about our free time and our hobby´s. Turned out that we both like to do sport. Mirwaisi go to the gym very often and I like to move outdoors by running or bike. We ended up planning our next meetings. How we going to go playing some different sport. Next time we will go to the swimming hall toghether.

4th meeting: ABC and AA’BC


This time around we did teach each other our alphabets.  To me this was rather interesting as I was thinking of using the Hungarian alphabets for an art project later on.

However, our first realization was that in the Hungarian alphabet there are a way more letters than in the Finnish alphabet. We counted that in total Hungarians have 44 letters and we Finns 29. This was partly explained so that in Hungary they don’t really use letter


but they combine it with other letters to form such letters as

GY, LY, NY and TY.

In the Hungarian language they also have such combined letters as

DZ, DZS, SZ and ZS,

which all were really strange to me, who has got used to it that one letter is only one letter – not 3 letters together.  So, to me the Hungarian letters were kind of beyond understanding, which actually made learning them lots of fun.

We also did talk about it that neither in Hungarian language all the letters are equally important, but there are some 4 that they hardly use. Though, on the same time, some letters seems to be almost too popular. If you only look at the alphabet, there are 2 x A, 2 x E, 4 x O and 4 x U, even if you, of course, pronounce them differently.

In Fruzsi’s blog post you are able to see the entire alphabets.







I met up with Mutsumi at TAMK for our first private lesson at monday evening. We had agreed that she will teach me very basics of Japanese and I’ll help her understand the Finnish pronunciation.

We started by her teaching me Hiragana-alphabets and some basic grammar. Learning the rules how to use the Hiragana didn’t appear to be that hard. The hardest part will be memorizing the entire alphabet because of two reasons. First being the obvious one, it is entirely alien to me and secondly I’m not good at memorizing raw data without any logic involved in it. Luckily (and fortunately for me) the two rules of grammar we went through were extremely easy to remember. If you want to turn a sentence into a question you simply add “ka” at the end of the sentence. Another rule she taught me was how to say someone’s nationality. That simply involves adding “jin” suffix to the name of the country the person is from. For example, Finland in Japanese is Finlando, so a Finn is Finlando-jin.

For the first Finnish lesson with Mutsumi I had decided to focus on one of two hardest parts of Finnish language foreigners have problems with: pronunciation. I noticed, during the street food fiesta meeting, when I was writing couple of Japanese sentences down in Roman alphabet, or Romaji in Japanese, that Mutsumi corrected me when I made mistakes despite the fact I was writing them down the way they sounded like in Finnish. It gave me an idea that if she isn’t able to pronounce Finnish the correct way, then maybe Japanese will help her speak it easier.

I started by giving her short and simple words to pronounce just to see how she would pronounce Finnish in different situations, such as the cases of double letters. Pronunciation proved to be off, as I suspected, and the simple word “tee” (which is “tea” in English) finalized the pattern she was using; she was reading them as if they were English. As we discussed this for short while, Mutsumi mentioned that she was feeling abandoning her attempts trying to speak Finnish. She was so revitalized after she learned she should not try to say the words with English pronunciation, but instead in Japanese. With this new realization, her Finnish was at par with the native Finns! Both of us were extremely happy about the situation. Only letters she had problems with are U, Ä and Ö, but with practice she managed to pronounce them the correct way. Now she only needs to keep up practicing so those sounds come out naturally.

I’d say it was lesson well spent for both of us!



First we decided to meet at Cafe Aitoleipä 12.00. I was there one hour before (because of the Easter someone needed to find out is it open, because internet didn’t tell). At 11.45 I went there again, but it was full. I had time, so I tried to find a better place for us (place where we can at least sit). Just 200 meters from Cafe Aitoleipä there is Pyynikin munkkikahvila, and it was not full. I sent a message to every one and we decided to go to Pyynikin munkkikahvila. < —–There you can get Tampere’s best doughnuts by the way 😉

I went inside to wait others, because NYSSE (Tampere’s public buss) was late again. When everyone arrived we started to test our learning by using Quizzlet. We went through all our previous meetings and tried to remember words what we should have learned. I can tell you that mine were bit lost…

Diego did same thing (but of course he tried to remember Finnish words) and he was pretty good. Great job Diego and thank you for our learning 🙂

WhatsApp Image 2017-04-17 at 13.17.38

-Minttu <3

Several meetings later

Hi all,

I will walk you through our first four awesome meetings with Anna with a post that is a bit longer in attempt to compensate for my initial inactivity (sorry about that).

First we met over a delicious meal of hot wings in the city. We discussed our preliminary plans and what each of us wants to get from the course. The plan was simple: Anna was going to teach me basic Korean words, expressions, customs and behaviour; and I was going to help her out with more advanced things in English. During that meeting we learned important things, like how to say cheers in Korean for example.

Our second meeting was the most awesome so far. We went to the Sky bar on top of the Sokos hotel. We got down to some serious language learning, coffee drinking and scenery observation. Anna showed me the Korean characters and we started practising reading and writing with simple words like mom, dad, hello and others.

please don't mind my handwriting... it's difficult with a whole new alphabet
please don’t mind my handwriting… it’s difficult with a whole new alphabet

After Anna showed me how to write in Korean, I showed her the Bulgarian alphabet and she was interested to learn that. It was lots of fun to talk in English and to write in Korean and Cyrillic. I showed her some basic words and she tried to read them out loud and I was amazed how fast she was catching on – way faster than I was with Korean. The top of my evening was when she could read Благодаря /blagodaria/, meaning Thank you in Bulgarian. Suddenly our plan changed and Anna was much more interested to learn things in Bulgarian. This is fine by me, because this way I can show her typical things for my language and country and she would still be improving her English skills as we are talking in English anyway.

The next two meetings we had in the kitchen in Lapinkaari. First Anna and a friend of hers cooked Japchae and a soup with egg and leek. It was all delicious and I can’t wait to show how it’s done to my friends and family back home in Bulgaria and the Netherlands. The other time I cooked for them some typical Bulgarian things. Lots of other people joined us for the meal and it was fun.

Japchae korean soup

In a nutshell, I am really happy with our arrangement with Anna and I am looking forward to learning more and teaching more.

Russian aplahbet! #6

Yesterday, i met my group in wayne’s coffee in koskikatu 7! It’s been a while that we hadn’t in group.

So, During this meeting we have learn the Russian alphabet which is quite complicated. indeed it is composed by 32 letters, and most of theses letters come from Greece alhabet. So it is very different by certain aspect with my alphabet. We also learn their pronunciation which is the same with the french alphabet sometimes but the position of the letter is different.


We also learn the number from 1 to 10 with their pronunciation.

1 – оди́н [adín]
2 – два [dva]
3 – три [trí]
4 – четы́ре [chitúir’e]
5 – пять [p’at’]
6 – шесть [shest’]
7 – семь [sem’]
8 – во́семь [vósim’]
9 – де́вять [d’évit’]
10 – де́сять [d’ésit’]

After that we talk about other things like is we have question about their language, country. Sabrina and Christine made a little course of german too at the end . So they can see where was our level in this language for the next German lesson.

It was an interesting, and funny appointment, i’m looking forward the next meeting!


жизнь means life

Today we had our first lesson in russian. We met in Wayne’s coffee and drank hot chocolate while we learned the cyrillic alphabet. It’s really hard because it’s there are so many different letters than in ours.


For remembering the letters better, we wrote down one word for each letter. These words were all similar to the english words, so it was easier for us.

Letter Russian Word Translation
A Алина Alina
б банан banana
В Вячеслав Viacheslav
г гитара guitar
д дом house
E Ереван Yerevan
Ё Ёлки christmas tree
ж жизнь life
з заяц hare
И икра caviar
й йога yoga
к кактус cactus
Л лимон lemon
M Мама mom
Н нет no
O Олимп Olymp
П Папа dad
P Россия Russia
C Сибирь Siberia
T Телефон telephone
У Украина Ukraine
Ф Финляндия Finland
X ха-ха ha-ha
ц цунами tsunami
ч чашка cup
ш шарф scarf
щ борщ borsch
Э Эдвард Edward
Ю Юлия Julia

I learned also to write my name in russian and the numbers from 1 to 10. My name is written like this: Сабрина. Here is a great video for you to learn the numbers.


nice korean session

Two days after first meeting, on last Thursday we had first Korean lesson.

In group we decided that it would be better if girls teach me the language not simultaneously but alterating. Following such concept, studying will be easier for everybody.

Honestly, my first Korean session was amazing. I mean, it was mind blowing of course, but still great.

Jihee was discusing the korean alphabet its pecularities and pronunciation.

Quite hard. sometimes I just do not see the difference between some vowels, but desperately trying. Nevertheless, I discovered that some sounds in russian and in korean are absolutely the same! And this simplifies spelling them.

Also Jihee showed me different matches of vowels and consonants and the sounds they produce together. And she presented the concept of writing. Depending on a symbol its writen right or down.

korean alphabet

beginning of ru

Hey hey

We are a group of three girls : Jihee, Yra and Daria. Languages we learn and teach are (South, of course) Korean and Russian.

For the first meeting, we decided not to create anything outstanding and we had lesson at tamk library. This session was for Russian. Since it was an introduction lesson girls were styding the alphabet.  I was reading aloud and they were repeating.  After they become quite fluent in letters and sounds, girls wrote their names using russian letters. In the end we just went throug basic words :

Hi-  привет (privet)
Good-хорошо (harasho)

We will focus on alphabet and pronunciation  on future meetings.

I like the way how my girls are interested in learning Russian. This is my biggest motivation to prepare materials and to search for ideas of teaching.

and here we are on the picture. I have no clue why but our faces are shining11992272_818460111602161_183630868_n

Spanish Class and Korean alphabet

Our second meeting was a Spanish/ Korean class with Haley.

First Haley and I went to dinner to the Italian restaurant, Napoli  in downtown of Tampere, in order to meet each other better. We were talking about our experience in Tampere, and also we decided the objectives that we will want to achieve in this Spanish lessons.

Went we finished the dinner we went to Haley’s resident, TOAS city, and there we started our Spanish class.

First of all, I tried to explain to Haley how to pronounce Spanish, I explained that my language only has 5 vowels (A, E, I, O, U) and the pronunciation of each one is always the same. Then I wrote different and easy sentences like Cómo estas? (How are you), Hola, me llamo Haley (Hello, My name is Haley)…  And I taught how to read Spanish sentences, because the sounds in Spanish are always the same ones, and are really easy to read them.

The most difficult part to teach was the conjugation of the verbs, because in Spanish we change the verb according with the time tens  (Future, present…)  and the person (first , second or thirst person and singular or plural) , so is not the same say  I read a book ( Yo leo un libro) than You read a book (Tu lees un libro).

Moreover, I taught to Haley the different between the verbs Estar and Ser, because in English both verbs have the  same meaning, verb TO BE. For example the verb Estar is related with the feelings and particular situations like Yo estoy cansado (I’m tired) or Yo estoy en la cocina (I’m in the kitchen) and we use the verb Ser when we talk about general or permanent situations like You soy alto (I’m tall) or Tu eres guapa (You are pretty).

Finally I explained how to count in Spanish, but was a little bit difficult to understand for Haley so we decided to do the numbers again in the future.

When we finish the Spanish class we start our Korean Class, Haley explain me the Korean alphabet, she wrote me all the alphabet and explain how to combine them. And the beginning was hard because this alphabet is completely different with English one, but finally I was able to make easy works and sentences, like our names.