Tag Archives: Cafe

Ratina’s Shopping center: dinner and hot chocolate

For our fourth meeting we went for a dinner to a restaurant in Ratina’s shopping center called Tratto. There we ate dinner, Junhyeok had pasta, Gayeon had risotto and I had a pizza. I also ordered some bread for us all, that was some kind of oily bread. Gayeon had cold, so I was worried about her slightly.

The restaurant was nice and had minimalistic feeling. We talked a bit about some cultural rules around eating, and there is not so much difference between Finnish and Korean manners around dinner, for example can your elbows be on the table (it does not matter in both cultures). In Finland it is usual to pay while on the table, but in Korea I heard they pay privately.

After eating we went to a different place, not far away from the restaurant, to drink some coffee (or I had hot chocolate) and to study. That was a good idea. I had prepared some words around food and restaurant. This time I remembered to take a copy of the material that I was teaching to myself also! Gayeon and Junhyeok are starting to pronounce Finnish words quite well already, and I was proud of them. This time I emphasized the letter “L” and how short it is in a word.

In my teaching I like to make sure that all the words are pronounced to the letter, because it is rather important in Finnish language, because the meaning of the word can change fairly quickly. I tried to prepare a bit less material to teach to Junhyeok and Gayeon than the last times, so that it would be less tiring and there would be less new words to learn. Also I would not be so tired to learn some Korean afterwards. I may need to be more careful on how I explain words or parts of the words, so that I will not confuse with my teaching.

Junhyeok took the lead in teaching me this time. I had not had time to practice Korean since I had exam that Friday, and I had exams also yesterday and today. It was good that he had prepared some revision, so I had good time learning, even though I did not remember much Korean that day for some reason.

Junhyeok taught me well, and I also copied words in Korean from Gayeons translations. It was fun even though I probably pronounced Korean very interestingly.  Writing Korean is a bit like drawing, and the letters are written in blocks. In the picture above you can see how to combine Korean letters! I think I will not be able to write Korean fluently easily.

At the end of our meeting I gave Gayeon and Junhyeok reflectors, because it is going to get dark and everybody in Finland have reflectors (or should have them) during winter. For our next meeting I will try to memorize the Korean letters and also how to pronounce them, and I am looking forwards seeing Gayeon and Junhyeok after two weeks.

 

Fourth meeting

We met in a restaurant in Ratinas shopping center for dinner last Friday. We each ordered different food. I ate pasta. This pasta was pretty good except it was a little salty. After dinner, we went to a café nearby to study. I learned lots of Finnish words about food and restaurant there.

Also, I taught Laura a conversation in cafes and how to pronounce Korean letter which is Hangeul. I thought the way to pronounce alphabet is the most important because we don’t use the Roman alphabet. I hope Laura find it easy although I thought her that poorly.

At the end of our meeting, I was given a gift which is a reflector from Laura. I was going to buy that, so I was really happy with that.

We will talk about our own food next time. I’m looking forward to our next meeting.  

Loppu hyvin, kaikki hyvin. – Ende gut, alles gut. (:

Today’s meeting was all about getting into the “Finnish-zone”! To accomplish the right atmosphere, we met in one of the oldest cafés in Tampere: Café Siilinkari! A place full of memories of people who live(d) and visited Tampere! Before we started our lesson, we have enjoyed something delicious and exchanged a few personal things, just like meeting friends for a coffee and an afternoon of laughter. That’s exactly how it feels when we get together!

I’m quite interested in learning as much Finnish as humanly possible in the short amount of time I have during the semester, but for some reason I feel like the Basic Finnish courses/books give/s me about 80% vocabulary/phrases I can hardly use in day-to-day conversations. And that’s where Antero, and the Each-One-Teach-One course, comes in! Kiitoksia! I want to use my knowledge in the real world not just in theory! That’s why I asked a hundred questions. From “Mikä bussi menee Keskustasta TAMKiin?” [lit.: What bus goes from the city centre to TAMK?] or “Saisinko jälkiruoka?” [May I have a dessert?] to “Mistä musiikista sä pidät?” [What kind of music do you like?] – everything that sounds worth knowing at this moment! Of course, there is plenty more, but we got a lot of useful sentences we will learn by heart, so we can interact with the locals in their native language soon!

I liked this meeting a lot because I realized that I know more than I thought and I’m starting to get a feeling for the word order of the Finnish language just as the suffixes which are quite crazy in Finnish! But I love it. The more I learn the more I enjoy learning such an amazing and rare language.

I’m really curious where this journey will take me! It’s for sure one of my favorite experiences in learning a new language so far! 🙂

Näkemiin!

Second meeting

We met at the Metso library and look around the library last Friday. I went there for the first time. The library had a lot of books and many sections where I can listen to music and play instruments which were very interesting. Also, the library was very clean and good.

While spending some time on the tour of the library, we found some books about Korea. They had a few books about North Korea. It’s pretty surprising because I’ve never seen books about North Korea in South Korea. After the tour, we studied Finnish and Korean at the café on the third floor.

I learned about cutlery and food in Finnish. I think the words that I was taught are going to be very helpful when I go grocery shopping. Learning Finnish has been quite difficult for me so far because it looks like English in mixed order and every single word is new to me. So I need to learn some words by heart.

The second meeting was very good. Hopefully, The next meeting will also be good.

Pyynikin Munkkikahvila ja ostoksia illalla

Last Saturday we were planning to go to Pyyniking observation tower to try donuts cooked according to a secret recipe, but the weather did not look good enough for walking so long and climbing on the top of the tower, so we remembered that we can try the same munkit in the cozy cafe in the city centre. I was the first one so I ordered a donut and coffee and was just waiting for guys.

When Maksim and Ilona came, they made an order as well and we started to talk. Of course, we tried to replace English with Russian or Finnish, but we realized that for the next meetings it’s better to prepare some questions about what we want to study or a small plan of the lesson. But anyway, I’ve learnt how to order coffee and we just enjoyed our meal.

When we were done with coffee, we decided to go to Sokos shopping center to learn more words which we use every day, like soap – saippua, toothbrush – hammasharja, toothpaste – hammastahna, expensive – kallis and so on. In Sokos we found a kirjakauppa where we saw moomin toys and guys told me more about them. After some time I had to leave, but we got some nice ideas for the next meeting! 🙂 Read about it next week 😉 See you!

Alku aina hankala. ♥ Aller Anfang ist schwer.

My second „Each One Teach One” meeting, this time with the entire group, took place at “Pella’s Café”. Now that it’s getting slightly colder after a great summer we decided to meet in a cosier place than we did the last time.

We continued our learning with Vocabulary/Phrases lists about clothes, weather, body and transport. For this matter, Antero prepared a list with words he thought would be important. Melanie and I helped our German learners with the right German translations. It was interesting to see that some words sounded or looked similar in either English-German [jacket – Jacke] or German-Finnish [Hose – housut]. Some words lead to beaming smiles on the Finnish faces just like “Handschuh” [gloves]. Yes, we Germans put ‘shoes’ for our hands on, when it’s getting cold outside! 😉

Besides learning new words, it was interesting to me that Finns talk differently about the weather. The German language has specific words for specific actions related to weather while the Finnish language uses terms like “it’s raining snow”[sataa lunta] for “it’s snowing”.

Mielenkiintoinen !!

While exchanging our languages I enjoyed the relaxed atmosphere we shared in the group which also lead to some interest from locals. Some seemed to be quite interested when the Finns started to say German words and vice versa.

Furthermore, we decided to meet every Monday from now on since this day suits us the most. Apart from the Monday, we try to find a second date per week. For next Monday everyone will come up with a few verbs he/she would like to learn. Our next meeting will be a “Finnish lesson” since we focused this time more on German. 😊

Näkemiin!!

 

Our First Meeting

Last Monday the girls and I had our first meeting. We went to a cafe and I had a piece of carrot cake, which was delicious but really expensive (I’m not used to these kind of prices yet).

During our meeting we talked about what kind of thing we would like to do during this course and we came up with some great ideas mainly focused in trying to show each other different aspects of our culture. Because we’re four spanish talking girls and one finish, we thought we could share with Anni the differences between each one of our cultures. We also talked about what do we want to learn about each language. I think these course would be so much fun and the girls seem so kind already.

Now I leave you with a picture of the leftovers of our amazing meal:

The leftovers of our first meeting

First meeting

Gayeun, Laura, and I had the first meeting this Friday.

We met at Tampereen Vohvelikahvila which is a small café and stayed for about 2 hours there.

We taught our own languages to each other eating some coffee and waffles by using some handouts prepared for the meeting. Above all, the waffle and coffee were good.

we started off with basics such as the alphabet, numbers, and greetings or something. I was taught some words and expressions by Laura, but these aren’t familiar to me, so it wasn’t easy for me. Also, Laura probably felt difficult in learning Korean, because Korean has nothing in common with Finnish and English. We didn’t do many things at our first meeting, but it was a good start. I’ve never taught someone my mother tongue in English, so it was pretty awkward for me. I believe everything is going to get better over time.

I think we’d better talk about not only language but our cultures next time.

I’m looking forward to our next meeting.

Studying between waffles

Hello!

Today we met for the first time to study each others languages, Finnish and Korean. We went to Tampereen Vohvelikahvila, a famous cafe in Tampere for it’s delicious waffles. It is quite cozy little cafe, small, but very popular.

The whipped cream on my and GaYeons waffles had time to melt a bit, but the waffles were tasty anyways. I do recommend!

We had prepared some studying material, for example alphabets and introductions to teach. There is quite a difference between Finnish and Korean alphabets, and some sounds are strange also. Some letters in Korean alphabets sounds exactly the same for me.

Here is a picture, where you can see the Korean alphabets, and some material, that I had prepared. In my material (on the right side of the picture) there is words in Finnish in the first column, then the second column is for the English equivalent, and then there is empty column to put translation in Korean. We also went through numbers 1-10 in both languages.

As a teacher I gave GaYeon and JunHyeok a lot of information about Finnish language, and I hope I didn’t confuse them with my passionate explanations. 🙂

In the future, I think I have to think more carefully how I teach, and maybe add some useful complete sentences to the material. It is a bit difficult to teach when you don’t really know where to start.

As a student learning Korean, the most difficult thing to me to learn will be learning to pronounce the different sounds correctly. I am glad that I have two teachers, because everyone teaches differently, so I will learn in two ways and maybe understand a bit better.

All in all, I think we had a great start for our language learning sessions, and we get along really well. I’m looking forward for our next meeting.

-Laura

Fourth meeting: Holidays!

This one was one of the most interesting topics for me: how we celebrate the biggest holidays of the year. So in our fourth meeting we discussed about three major holidays: Christmas, Easter and New Years. The point was to see how the ways to celebrate these holidays are different, or if they are the same. I honestly knew nothing about how they celebrate these holidays in Portugal but I had a feeling that it wouldn’t be the same. We talked about traditional foods we enjoy on holidays and also traditions themselves.

 

While thinking about what to tell about Finnish traditions we thought that it’s kinda hard since everyone has their own traditions. For example, we really don’t have traditions for Easter. But we managed to come up with some common ones to tell Renata about. It was interesting to hear about these holidays in Portugal. For example the foods they eat at Christmas – can’t even imagine some of them. We also  went through some vocabulary about these holidays, like how to wish “Merry Christmas” in both Finnish and Portuguese.

 

Like I said in the beginning, I found this topic quite interesting. I’d like to see and experience these holiday celebrations in foreign countries myself. I mean, I love Finnish traditions with all my heart and woudln’t change my Christmas for anything in the world, but still. It would be kinda cool to see how different it can really be.