Tag Archives: Cafe

Fourth meeting: Holidays!

This one was one of the most interesting topics for me: how we celebrate the biggest holidays of the year. So in our fourth meeting we discussed about three major holidays: Christmas, Easter and New Years. The point was to see how the ways to celebrate these holidays are different, or if they are the same. I honestly knew nothing about how they celebrate these holidays in Portugal but I had a feeling that it wouldn’t be the same. We talked about traditional foods we enjoy on holidays and also traditions themselves.

 

While thinking about what to tell about Finnish traditions we thought that it’s kinda hard since everyone has their own traditions. For example, we really don’t have traditions for Easter. But we managed to come up with some common ones to tell Renata about. It was interesting to hear about these holidays in Portugal. For example the foods they eat at Christmas – can’t even imagine some of them. We also  went through some vocabulary about these holidays, like how to wish “Merry Christmas” in both Finnish and Portuguese.

 

Like I said in the beginning, I found this topic quite interesting. I’d like to see and experience these holiday celebrations in foreign countries myself. I mean, I love Finnish traditions with all my heart and woudln’t change my Christmas for anything in the world, but still. It would be kinda cool to see how different it can really be.

Third meeting: Basic language

In our third meeting we discussed about some basic language stuff. We learned how to say hi and goodbye, how to introduce yourself and so on – basically the things you need for Portuguese small talk if you ever travel to Portugal. Since Renata already knew the most basic things in Finnish, we came up with something else instead, starting with different animals. Then we tried to gather some useful phrases in Finnish, like how to tell whether you like something or not. And then colours. So this meeting was all about the basics of each others language.

 

I learned that Portuguese is pretty damn dissicult. There is all this stuff about having to know whether the word is feminine or masculine or something? And then it effects the way you use it in a phrase. Then there is like a million ways to pronounce things and different letters combined mean some weird sounds in the middle of the word. We went through how you say each word but honestly I’m forgetting most of it in seconds since there’s so much to learn – can’t keep everything in my head. Oh and also there are different markings above the letters and they also make the letter sound different. I’m really starting to love how Finnish is pronounced exactly like you write it.

 

But yeah, this meeting was definetely full of stuff. I got so much new information about Portuguese that it’ll probably take weeks to figure all this out, if I even can. Thank god for simple pronouncing, Finnish language I love you.

3. Meeting at Tampere city center

Today we had a meeting at Tampere city center. We met at the railway station and walked first to Stockmann. It was pretty hard for me to talk and think at the same time we walked around the Stockmann. We decided to walk some café and we chose Pella’s cafe. It was my first time there! Färhad got the change to order something in Finnish. There was so nice lady behind the counter who used Finnish and English when Färhad ordered his hot chocolate. It went well. I took also hot chocolate and I have to say it was really good!

During drinking the hot chocolate we talked about horse riding and cultures. I showed few videos about my riding with Icelandic horse and tried to tell when I change gait. I helped Färhad to translate Finnish questions which he had from one game where you have word or picture on your forehead and you ask questions and try to guess what you are. Then I got the idea that we could play some game when we meet next time. It would help me to speak more English and Färhad could use Finnish as much as he can!

 

This time my speaking English skills wasn’t that fluent what it was last time. I think I was little bit tired and it felt really annoying that I didn’t remember all the words immediately. Next week we planned to meet two or three times. We could play some games and go to Ideapark!

 

Fifth Meeting – What time is it?

For this meeting we met at the Waffle Café again!

We learned about how to say the time. Telling the hour in Finnish is quite similar to English, but is Spanish it is slightly different. What we did was drawing some clocks with different cases and wrote the time in Finnish and Spanish. I think we need to practise a lot to learn it properly.

We learned the greetings we should say depending on the time of the day.

We also talked a bit about Lapland because I really want to go there this year. Getuar has never been there but Janica has worked there during Christmas season some time ago. So it was good that she could gave some tips 🙂

Fourth meeting – Days of the week

We met in the Waffle Café which is a lovely place with delicious food!

The topic for this meeting was the days of the week. I already know them in Finnish but Getuar was learning them in Spanish for the first time. I told them that the names of the days comes from the planets and sun and moon.
Lunes (Monday) comes from Luna (Moon). Martes (Tuesday) comes from Marte. Miércoles (Wednesday) comes from Mercurio (Mercury). Jueves (Thursday) comes from Júpiter. Viernes (Friday) comes from Venus. Sábado (Saturday) comes from the Hebrew Sabbath. Domingo (Sunday) comes from Sol (sun).

I think it is easy for me to remember the days of week in Finnish because I can relate most of them to the English, but I think to Getuar it might be more difficult to remember them in Spanish because you cannot relate the days to Finnish nor English.

In this meeting we also started talking about Christmas traditions. We wanted to know the differences and similarities on how we celebrate Christmas. The conversation was very interesting.

For example, in Uruguay families get together for dinner at Christmas Eve and at midnight we hug and congratulate each other and there are Fireworks, after that we open the presents. In Finland there are not Fireworks at Christmas, and for example in Janica’s family they open the presents in the afternoon of Christmas Eve.

We had to leave because the Café was closing, but the conversation was so interesting that we will continue talking about that. We also think it would be a good idea to have a Christmas party together!

Testing 1, 2, 3

Hey everyone! 🙂

My name is Elisa and I’m a student here in TAMK. This is my fourth and final year of vehicle engineering studies. I am teaching Finnish to my pair Jocelyn who is teaching me Dutch.

Our first meeting was 19th October and it took place at the new cafe and restaurant Puisto in Koskipuisto. The cafe was really cute and there were many different delicious-looking cakes and pastries. I chose blueberry tea and a piece of lime and white chocolate cake. It was really good!

I was excited to learn some Dutch because all I knew about the language was that it kind of sounds and looks like English and German combined. I learned numbers from 0 to 100. First I repeated the numbers after Jocelyn and it was surprisingly easy. That was probably because I used to study German when I was younger and they sound somewhat similar. After repeating the numbers, I tried to write them down but I got almost all of them wrong the first time. While writing them down correctly I learned some things about pronunciation for example the letter v is pronounced as ’f’ and ’ij’ is pronounced as ’äi’ like in the Finnish word for mother ’äiti’.

Jocelyn already knew the numbers in Finnish because she is taking the Basics of Finnish course. I taught her the shorter spoken language versions of numbers. We also taught each other how to say hello and goodbye.

Until next time!

 

Doei!

10TH

PYYNIKIN MUNKKIKAHVILA

First we decided to meet at Cafe Aitoleipä 12.00. I was there one hour before (because of the Easter someone needed to find out is it open, because internet didn’t tell). At 11.45 I went there again, but it was full. I had time, so I tried to find a better place for us (place where we can at least sit). Just 200 meters from Cafe Aitoleipä there is Pyynikin munkkikahvila, and it was not full. I sent a message to every one and we decided to go to Pyynikin munkkikahvila. < —–There you can get Tampere’s best doughnuts by the way 😉

I went inside to wait others, because NYSSE (Tampere’s public buss) was late again. When everyone arrived we started to test our learning by using Quizzlet. We went through all our previous meetings and tried to remember words what we should have learned. I can tell you that mine were bit lost…

Diego did same thing (but of course he tried to remember Finnish words) and he was pretty good. Great job Diego and thank you for our learning 🙂

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-Minttu <3

Tullintori

BRANDER CAFETERIA 

First we ordered coffee. Ella had big one and Diego ordered small one.
Un cafe pequeno = one small coffee
Un cafe grande = one big coffee
Topic for our eighth meeting was to translate a small kids book from spanish to english and from finnish to english. Spanish book was about duck family 😀 That`s why I learnt quite weird words…
FOR EXAMPLE:
I learnt that boy duck is pato and girl duck is pata. Same thing for pig (cerdo and cerda).
El mundo es muchisimo mas grande.
The World is much more bigger.
Mama pata paro de hablar.
Duck mom stopped speaking.
Baby duck went away.
Bebe pata se fue.
Ella se asusto.
She got scared.
After 30 minutes we were pretty restless and we decided to make some “useful sentences”.
Estoy muy cansada.
I am tired.
I like hot spanish guys.
A mi me gustan los chicos espanjoles atractivos. <— so important 😀
Hot coffee is also fine.
El cafe tambien es bueno.
Where can I find a toilet?
Donde esta el bano (banjo).
Sorry, can you help me. I am lost. Pleace.
Perdon, me podrias ayudar. Estoy perdida. Por favor.
I over slept.
Me quede dormido.
I feel sick.
Estoy enfermo.
I am getting sick.
Me estoy enfermando.
I am blushing.
Estoy colorada.
Where is my drink?
Donde esta mi trago?
Where is shopping centre?
Donde esta el shopping?
Where is buss station?
Donde esta la estacion?
Train = tren
Right = derecha
Left = izquierda
In front of = enfrente
Behind = atras
Next to = alado
After two hours we were ready and it was time to leave. So stand up and go.
Stand up = levantta te
EOTO
– Minttu <3

The 3rd meeting: Fazer Cafe and Lukulaari book store

So, this time Ida and I decided to meet in the city centre, because she wanted to explore Lukulaari, as she’d heard about from a friend and wanted to take a look. I’d been to Lukulaari several times already, so I promised to take her there – even though a used books and disks store is a dangerous place for me and my purse 🙂

But first, we met at Fazer cafe and talked – wise choice, as it turned out, since there wasn’t much talking at the store, just searching through all those shelves 🙂 On the other hand, we did speak only Finnish that time, but decided to make the next meeting purely Swedish.

In our meetings, we don’t seriously study grammar or make word lists, but just talk and correct each other, because casual conversation practice is what we both need the most. However, we did have a chance to see how differently Finnish is taught in Russia and Finland (meaning, to Finnish Swedes). For, example, cases. In Russia – and, actually, in most language textbooks – there are terms such as yksikön partitiivi, monikon partitiivi etc. Ida was taught in her school that there are 1st, 2nd etc object forms. SO, we sometimes had a difficulty understanding each other’s explanations at first, before we realised what it was all about 🙂

And then, at Lukulaari, there was a lot of stuff to silently look through. I did not even dare approach the bookshelves – Ida went there. Instead, I looked through the dvds for some specific movies. The selection is huge, and they do not even have the time to place the arriving stuff in some kind of order, so one has to look through everything! It is exciting, but takes a lot of time. But, yes, Lukulaari is a place I would definitely recommend for someone who wants used books – they have books in Finnish, English, Swedish and other languages – and dvds and cds etc.

8th meeting with Ryoko / 14.12.2016

We decided to meet again the next day because Ryoko told me she had some trouble with her Finnish homework.

We met up at Tullintori and went from there to Wayne’s Coffee to study together.

Ryoko’s Finnish course is really quite difficult! She’s studying some things that are not obvious for Finnish people either, like lauseenvastike. It’s something we learn already in elementary and middle school but it’s difficult when you really start thinking about it and have to explain it to someone. haha

Since I’m not officially studying Japanese for now, but want to more just practice it, we decided to do it so that I was talking Japanese while explaining these Finnish grammar points to Ryoko. It was good practice for me and maybe it was also easier for Ryoko to understand it that way. 😀 

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