Tag Archives: chineese

Farewell- Independence Day Reception

Yesterday afternoon our EOTO group attended the Independence Day Reception at Tampere City Hall. The programme consisted in a choir, a speech, a theatre work and a light buffet dinner. I was impressed by how big and elegant the city hall was.

The buffet dinner consisted in typical Finnish food (Karelian pie, reindeer pastry, 100 vuotta vanha cake), and wine.

Here is some vocabulary that we learnt during the evening:

English- Spanish- Chineese- German

  • Birthday- Cumpleaños- 生日 (shengri)-  Geburtstag
  • Cake- Tarta- 蛋糕 (dangao)- Kuchen
  • Wine- Vino- 葡萄酒 (putaojiu)- Wein
  • Reindeer- Reno- 驯鹿 (xunlu)- Rentiere
  • Farewell- Despedida- 告别 (gaobie)-  Abschied
  • Present- Regalo- 礼物 (liwu)- Geschenk
  • City hall – Ayuntamiento- 市政厅 (sizen ting)- Rathaus
  • Theater- Teatro- 剧院 (juyuan)- Theater
  • Banquet hall- Sala de banquetes- 宴会厅 (yanhui ting)- Festsaal
  • Independence – Independencia- 独立(duli)- Unabhängigkeit
  • Party – Fiesta- 派对 (paidui)- Feier
  • Elegant – Elegante- 再见(zaijian)- Elegant

After having dinner, we took several pictures at different places of the city hall and also at the photocall they had installed for TAMK, UTA and TUT students.

Once the party was over, it was time to say goodbye, and Loy gave each of us a Malaysian keychain as a farewell gift.

I really liked the Each One Teach one course, because in addition to meeting great people from different countries, and knowing more about their culture and their language, in each meeting we did many different funny activities, although the worst part is that I’m going to miss a lot all of the members of my group. It was a pleasure to meet all of you! Who knows, maybe we will see each other in the future in each other’s country!

Hockey Match

Last Tuesday we went to watch an ice-hockey match at the Tampere ice stadium (Tappara against Ässät). For me, it was the first time that I saw an ice-hockey game, and I really liked the experience.
While we watched the game I explained them that in Spain we don’t have teams of cheerleaders like in Finland and in other countries, at least in small cities, and the sport that is most practiced is football, since Spain has various of the most famous football teams in the world, like Real Madrid and Barça. In Germany one of the sports that is most practiced is tennis, although football is also one of the favorites sports, and in Malaysia football is also the preferred sport. We also learnt some vocabulary related to ice- hockey in German, Chineese and Spanish.

English- German- Chineese- Spanish

(ice)Hockey – Eishockey-  曲棍球 (qugunqiu) – Hockey (sobre hielo)
Hockey stick – Eishockeyschläger- 曲棍球棍 (qugunqiugun) – Palo de hockey/stick
Game – Spiel- 游戏 (youxi)- Juego/partido
Tricot – Tricot- 经编 (jing bian)- Camisola
Team – Mannschaft- 队伍 (duiwu)- Equipo
Referee – Schiedsrichter- 裁判 (caipan)- Árbitro
Ice-skates – Schlittschuhe- 溜冰 (liubing)- Patines de hielo
Goal – Tor- 入球 (ru qiu)-  Gol
To play – spielen- 玩 (wan)- Jugar
Whistle – Pfeife- 哨子 (shaozi)- Silbar
Cheerleader- Cheerleader- 啦啦队 (laladiu)- Animadora

The final score was Tappara 3-4 Ässät. After watching the game we spent some time with people from another EOTO group who had also gone to watch the game; we took some pictures all together and went with them to the nearest bus stop to go home, since it was snowing and none had an umbrella…  We haven’t got used to the beginning of winter yet!

EOTO Christmas Party

Last Monday, the EOTO Christmas Party was celebrated in TAMK, so we decided to buy some food and beberages and go to celebrate it. There were people from many different groups and countries. There was a typical Finnish mulled wine with spices called “glögi” and cider to drink, and cookies and chips to eat.

While we were eating, we talked about the different Christmas traditions of each country, as well as the typical Christmas dinner menus. I told them that in Spain lamb is one of the typical meals that we eat at Christmas, something that is also done in Germany, but not in Malaysia. Loy explained us that in Malaysia there isn’t a Christmas tradition as we know it in Europe; there are no gifts or dinner with the family, but people gather with their friends and go to do some activities together, usually a barbecue.

In addition to that, I explained them that although in Spain we also celebrate Christmas and have dinner together with our families, we also celebrate another party on January 6th, called “Reyes Magos”, and then is when we give all the presents to each other. The celebrations officially begin the evening before the Epiphany, on the night of the 5th of January, when the “Reyes Magos ride” (Cabalgata de los reyes magos, in Spanish) is celebrated in each city and town, and hundreds of people go out to the main streets of the urban centers to contemplate the recreation of the arrival of the wise men in the city.

After eating, we all played together with people from another groups to a card game called “Cards against humanity”. It was a very funny evening. Here are some of the words we learned during the afternoon:

ENGLISH- GERMAN- CHINEESE- SPANISH 

  • Cookies – Kekse- 饼干 (binggan) – Galletas
  • Christmas – Weihnachten – 圣诞 (shengdan) – Navidades
  • Snow – Schnee- 雪 (xue) – Nieve
  • Santa claus – Weihnachtsmann- 圣诞老人 (shengdanlaoren) – Papá Noel
  • Lamb – Lamm – 羊肉 (yangrou) – Cordero
  • Present – Geschenk-礼物 (liwu) – Regalo
  • Song –Lied- 歌 (ge) – Canción

Oktoberfest

Our EOTO group decided to go the Oktoberfest that was celebrated last 5th of October in Tampere.

Tomi, one of the German boys in our group, had suggested it because it’s a very famous beer festival that is held annualy in Bavaria, Germany, and it was also a good idea to immerse ourselves in some Bavarian culture, because it’s celebrated there since 1810.

There are many other cities across the world that also held Oktoberfest Celebrations that are modeled after the original Munich event, and Tampere had its own celebration last 5th of October.

Tomi explained us that in Bavaria, it’s usual for peole to drink between 4 and 5 liters of beer during this festival, because the party is spread throughout the day, and people usually drink the beers in one liter jars.

I tried one small beer that I had never seen before, that contained banana and honey, and it was quite good.

We also ate some German dishes that contained sausages, cheese, meat and pickles.

The pub was decorated with many Bavarian flags, and on the tables there were cookies decorated with the colors of the flag.

We spent the whole evening talking about some traditions in Malasya, Germany and Spain, and had a lot of fun with the Bavarian orchestra that was playing accordions and trumpets in the pub.

Even though some had some other mishap due to drinking too much… It was a very funny evening!

 

Cooking a Malaysian typical dish

Last Monday, we met at Loy’s apartment to try the Malaysian typical dish with the ingredients we bought in the last meeting.

When we arrived to his apartment, he had already started cooking, and at finally it was him who cooked everything.

These are the dishes he cooked:

  • 酿豆腐 (yong tau foo) = Meat with aubergine.
  • 炒菜心 (chao cai xin) =  Stir fried vegetable.
  • 米粉汤 (mi fen tang) = Noodles soup with meat.
  • He also made a chili and soy sauce to attach to the dishes.

To drink, we had a Spanish and a Chilean wine.

Loy  spent a great deal of time cooking the dishes; he studies Hospitality Management, so everything that he cooked was delicious.

While we were eating the food, we talked about the differences between Malaysian, Spanish and German table manners.

We could know that in Malaysian culture it’s not impolite to drink the soup from bowl, something that would be badly seen in the Spanish and German cultures.

Loy also told us that in Malaysia, as in Spain and Germany, it’s impolite making noise when sipping the soup.

It was a funny meeting (it’s always fun meeting with friends, especially if it’s to eat delicious dishes). Looking forward to try new dishes!

5th meeting: Languages

Our fifth meeting was at the 17th of November and it was about languages: russian, czech and chineese. Russian and czech are in one language family, that is why there are a lot of words in both languaged which are the same,

but chineese is totally hard for me, i tried to write numbers 0-10 and did it may be for 25 minutes: all of this strange hieroglifhs  is really hard. But even when I finished, Jenny said that it looks like numbers which were written by 5 years-old child:)

FA8g9ytwFIAK4zV_Q7MM10

Czech is not so hard because letters look like english and pronunciation sounds really easy for me.

So, it was interesting experience for me, because I never tried to write hierogliphs before.