Tag Archives: dutch

Delicious Dutch Dinner

Our 7th meeting took place on Sunday 19th of November and we met at Jocelyn’s apartment in Rauhaniemi. Our mission for the evening was to cook some traditional Dutch food. I was really looking forward to it because, well, food is always nice. We made carrot and potato stew with meatballs for dinner and a stroopwafelcake for dessert.

 

Jocelyn had already prepared the meatballs when I arrived and here is the recipe for the meatballs.

 

Gehaktbal                                                                  Meatball

200 g Gehakt                                                            200 g Minced meat

1 tl Zout                                                                      1 tsp Salt

2 tl Nootmuskaat                                                    2 tsp Nutmeg

2 tl Paprikapoeder                                                  2 tsp Paprika powder

1 tl Peper                                                                   1 tsp Pepper

½ Ei                                                                               ½  Egg

50 g Paneermeel                                                     50 g bread-crumbs

 

Bereidingswijze gehaktbal / Method of preparation meatballs

  1. Klop het ei. / Beat the egg.
  2. Voeg de kruiden en paneermeel toe. / Add the spices and bread-crumbs.
  3. Voeg dit toe aan het gehakt. / Add this mixture to the minced meat.
  4. Kneed tot een compacte massa. / Knead till a compact mass.
  5. Verdeel de massa in 2 stukken en rol tot gehaktballen. / Separate the mass into two pieces and roll them into a meatball.
  6. Braad voor ongeveer een uur. / Roast for about an hour.

 

When I arrived we started preparing the stew. Here is what you need for the stew.

 

Hutspot                                                                     Carrot and potato stew

750 g Aardappelen                                                 750 g Potatoes

750 g Wortelen                                                        750 g Carrots

1 Ui                                                                               1 Onion

25 g Boter                                                                  25 g Butter

50 ml Melk                                                                50 ml Milk

Snufje zout en peper                                             Pinch of salt and pepper

 

Bereidingswijze hutspot / Method of preparation stew

  1. Schil de aarappelen en snijd deze in evengrote stukken. / Peel the potatoes and cut into equally sized pieces.
  2. Snijd de ui in kleine stukken. / Cut the onion into small pieces.
  3. Schil de wortelen en snijd in kleinere stukken. / Peel the carrots and cut into smaller pieces.
  4. Doe de aardappelen, wortels en ui in een pan. / Put the potatoes, onion and carrots in a pan.
  5. Vul de pan met water en voeg een snufje zout toe. / Fill the pan with water and add a pinch of salt.
  6. Kook dit voor 20-25 minuten. / Cook for 20-25 minutes.
  7. Giet het water af en stamp alles door elkaar. / Pour off the water and mash everything.
  8. Roer de melk en boter erdoor en breng op smaak met zout en peper. / Mix the milk and butter with the stew and season with salt and pepper.
  9. Serveer met gehakballen en jus. / Serve with meatballs and gravy.

 

 

And then for the dessert we made a stroopwafelcake.

 

Stroopwafelcake                                                  Syrup waffle cake

200 g Zachte boter                                                 200 g Soft butter

200 g Suiker                                                              200 g Sugar

4 Eieren                                                                      4 Eggs

200 g Bloem                                                              200 g Flour

2 tl Bakpoeder                                                         2 tsp Baking powder

2 tl Vanillesuiker                                                      2 tsp Vanilla sugar

2 Stroopwafels                                                        2 Stroopwafels (Syrup waffles)

Snufje zout                                                                Pinch of Salt

 

Bereidingswijze stroopwafelcake / Method of Preparation stroopwafelcake

  1. Roer de boter zacht en voeg de suiker toe. / Mix the butter and add the sugar.
  2. Roer totdat het luchtig is en voeg een voor een de eieren toe. / Mix until it’s smooth and add the eggs one at a time.
  3. Voeg al mixend de bloem, bakpoeder en zout toe. / While mixing add the flour, baking powder and a pinch of salt.
  4. Breek de stroopwafels in kleine stukjes. / Break the stroopwafel in small pieces.
  5. Voeg de stroopwafel en vanillesuiker toe. / Add the stroopwafel and the vanilla sugar.
  6. Roer alles goed door elkaar. / Mix everything together.
  7. Vet de bakvorm in en giet het beslag in de vorm. / Grease the baking mold and pour the batter into the mold.
  8. Bak voor ongeveer 60 minuten op 180°C. / Bake at 180°C for about an hour.

 

 

The food was really good and I am definitely going to make them again! In the end, here is a photo that describes our cooking. We both cut our finger while cooking but it was worth it!

 

Proost!

For the 6th meeting we decided to meet at a bar and learn some free time related vocabulary, like how to order a drink for example. We met at Kivenheitto and we were supposed to play billiard but sadly the bar was really crowded for a Wednesday so we had to settle for a few games of table football. I am writing this post a few months late so I am not sure what the final score was but I am pretty sure I won… Memories grow sweeter with time.

After my supposed victory we went to a different, less crowded, bar called Salhojankadun Pub. I’ve heard that it is the oldest pub in Tampere and it is very conveniently located right downstairs from my apartment. At Salhojankadun Pub we enjoyed a few drinks and talked about vocabulary related to bars and drinks.

I had such a great time and I am looking forward to actually using these phrases someday!

 

Dutch holidays and traditions

Our 5th meeting was on 7th of November and we met at cafe Siilinkari in Hämeenkatu. It was quiet when we went there which was perfect for the meeting. Our first meeting was at cafe Puisto with its delicious cakes and pastries but Siilinkari had really good cake too. My choice for the evening was some green tea and a ‘mokkapala’ which is a coffee flavoured chocolate cake, kind of like a brownie.

 

We discussed some Finnish and Dutch holidays and traditions. While many of the Finnish holidays don’t have much other traditions but drinking alcohol, the Dutch holidays seemed to be a lot more traditional and there are many holidays in a year that kids are excited about.

 

King’s Day 

King’s day is celebrated on the 27th of April and it’s a national holiday in the Netherlands. The date marks the birthday of the king. On King’s Day there are a lot of flea markets where people are selling their used items. There are also many big festivities like concerts and other outdoor events. On King’s Day people usually wear orange clothes and there are orange pastries and drinks and so on.

 

Liberation Day

Liberation Day is celebrated annually on the 5th of May. Liberation Day marks the end of the German occupation during World War II. On Liberation Day there are celebrations like parades and music festivals all around the Netherlands. It is a national holiday but it is a paid holiday only every 5th year.

 

Sint Maarten’s Day

Sint Maarten’s Day is celebrated every year on 11th of November. In the evening children go from door to door with self-made lanterns. They sing songs and receive candy in return. I had actually heard something about this tradition back when I was around 12 years old and I used to study German. It seemed to be quite similar with the German tradition. Sint Maarten’s Day is also similar to a Finnish tradition in the Palm Sunday when children dress up as witches and from door to door wishing good health with self-decorated osiers.

 

Sinterklaas

The festivities begin in mid-November when Sinterklaas arrives to the Netherlands. Sinterklaas arrives from Spain with a ship filled with presents to the children. Sinterklaas travels around the country and visits public places like schools and shopping centers. In the evening children put their shoes in front of the fire place with a carrot (for Sinterklaas’ horse) and sing a song so that Sinterklaas knows where to come. In the morning they will find candy and presents in their shoes. Common treats are small cookies called ‘pepernoten’ and chocolate letters. The children are told that bad children who don’t behave well are taken to Spain in a sack. The main event during Sinterklaas’ stay in the Netherlands takes place on 5th of December. On that day everyone receives presents. When children get older and no longer believe in Sinterklaas the tradition is that family members give each other presents in a similar way as in “Secret Santa”. Presents are packed in funny or unusual ways and given with a personal note that is often a humorous poem.

 

New Year’s Eve

The New Year’s Eve celebrations are quite similar in the Netherlands as in Finland and all around the world. Some traditional things for a Dutch New Year’s Eve are ‘oliebollen’ which are traditional Dutch doughnuts with raisin and a bonfire that is made of Christmas trees.

 

It was really nice getting to know all the different holidays and traditions there are in the Netherlands. Especially King’s Day sounds really interesting because I like flea markets a lot, maybe I will visit Netherlands at the end of April some year!

Joulutorttu and Christmas cookies!

Tonight, it was unfortunately our last meeting. We decided for our last meeting to bake some Christmas cookies and some Joulutorttu. I had never baked gingerbread cookies and joulutorttu before, so I was really excited.

After we baked the Christmas cookies we decorated them with our self-made glace and some candies. The joulutorttu and most of the Christmas cookies turned out really good!

Because we were in such a Christmas mood we talked about words related to this amazing holiday.

 

English Finnish Dutch
Christmas Joulu Kerstmis
Merry Christmas Hyvää Joulua Zalig kerstfeest
Ginger bread Pipari Peperkoek
Christmas tree Joulukuusi Kerstboom
Santa Claus Joulupukki Kerstman
Snow Lumi Sneeuw
Mistletoe Mistelinoksa Maretak
Christmas lights Jouluvalot Kerstverlichting
Candle Kynttilä Kaars
Pre-Christmas party Pikkujoulut Pre Kerstfeest
Christmas decoration Joulukoriste Kerstversiering
Presents Lahjat Cadeaus
Chocolate Suklaa Chocolade
Snowman Lumiukko Sneeuwpop
Reindeer Poco Rendier
Sleigh Reki Slee
Christmas market Joulutori Kerstmarkt
Jingle bells Kulkuset Rinkelende bellen

 

I have to say that this course was totally what I expected! I learned a lot about the Finnish culture and language and that was my goal. It was also really nice to teach about my culture, because not a lot of people know a lot about the Dutch culture. Thanks Elisa for the really nice and fun meetings and for teaching me about the Finnish culture! Now it’s almost time to celebrate Christmas so I wish everyone a Hyvää Joulua!

Match night!

For our 9th meeting we decided to go to an ice hockey game. It was really exciting!

This game Tappara (Tampere) played against Kookoo (Kouvola). At the beginning it was really exciting because it was 0-0 for quite a long time, but at the end of the first part Tappara scored the first goal. Tappara stayed in the lead for the whole game and won with 3-0.

In my home country ice-hockey isn’t popular at all. I don’t know anyone who plays or played it. But I have to say that I really like watching ice-hockey, because it’s really exciting and there is a lot of action. Popular sports in my home country are soccer, hockey, volleyball and ice-skating.

 

During the breaks we talked about sport related words in our languages:

English Finnish Dutch
Ice-hockey Jääkiekko Ijshockey
Sports Urheilu Sport
Match Ottelu Wedstrijd
Referee Tuomari Scheidsrechter
Goal Maali Doelpunt
Ice skates Luistimet Schaatsen
Helmet Kypärä Helm
Captain Kapteeni Aanvoerder
Goalie Maalivahti Keeper
Team Joukkue Team
Field Kenttä Veld/baan
Opponent Vastustaja Tegenstander
Hockey stick Jääkiekkomaila Hockey stick
Baseball Pesäpallo Honkbal
Skiing Hiihto Skiën
Soccer Jalkopallo Voetbal

Pre-Christmas time!

My favorite holiday of the year is coming: Christmas!  I want to celebrate it as early as I can, so I love pre-Christmas parties. For this meeting we went to the Christmas party organized by EOTO.

 

Everyone had to bring some food, and I immediately knew what I wanted to take with me. Although in my home country it isn’t considered a Christmas cookie, it still kind of reminds me of Christmas. I took pepernoot with me. Pepernoten belong to a Dutch holiday celebrated in the beginning of December. While enjoying a drink and the pepernoten, Elisa and I talked about Christmas in our home countries.

 

I personally don’t celebrate Christmas with presents and Santa Claus, I celebrate the birth of Jesus. I celebrate the first day of Christmas on the 25th of December and the second day of Christmas on the 26th of December. My Christmases consist of going to church, being with family, eating a lot of food, listening to Christmas music and watching a lot of Christmas movies. I bet there are a lot of Dutch people who celebrate Christmas with presents and Santa Claus though.

 

In Finland they celebrate Christmas a little bit different. Finnish people celebrate Christmas eve on the 24th of December, and Christmas on the 25th of December. They celebrate Christmas even with Santa Claus and presents under the Christmas tree. They also sing a lot of songs and they write poems. On the 25th of December they celebrate a traditional Christmas day and on the 26th of December they celebrate Boxing day.

I didn’t expect this much of a difference between our way of celebrating Christmas. I think it was really interesting to talk about Christmas and I gained a lot of new knowledge about the Finnish culture. Now after talking about Christmas I can’t wait for celebrating it!

 

Double Dutch

Food night again! This time we made some typically Dutch food. We made hutspot with meatballs and for desert we made a stroopwafel cake. This was the second time I made hutspot and the first time I made meatballs and the stroopwafel cake. I wrote down all of the recipes.

Hutspot met een gehaktbal / Carrot and potato stew with a meatball

Things you need for the meatball:

Dutch English
200g Gehakt 200g Minced meat
1tl. Zout 1ts. Salt
2tl. Nootmuskaat 2ts. Nutmeg
2tl. Paprikapoeder 2ts. Paprika powder
1tl. Peper 1ts. Pepper
½ Ei ½ Egg
50g Paneermeel 50g bread-crumbs

 

Things you need for the stew:

Dutch English
750g Aardappelen 750g Potatoes
750g Wortelen 750g Carrots
1 Ui 1 Onion
25g Boter 25g Butter
50 ml Melk 50 ml Milk
Snufje zout en peper Pinch of salt and pepper

 

Bereidingswijze gehaktbal:

  1. Klop het ei.
  2. Voeg de kruiden en paneermeel toe.
  3. Voeg dit toe aan het gehakt.
  4. Kneed tot een compacte massa.
  5. Verdeel de massa in 2 stukken en rol tot gehaktballen.
  6. Braad voor ongeveer een uur.

Method of preparation meatballs:

  1. Beat the egg.
  2. Add the spices and bread-crumbs.
  3. Add this mixture to the minced meat.
  4. Knead till a compact mass.
  5. Separate the mass into 2 pieces and roll them into a meatball.
  6. Roast for about an hour.

Bereidingswijze hutspot:

  1. Schil de aarappelen en snijd deze in evengrote stukken.
  2. Snijd de ui in kleine stukken.
  3. Schil de wortelen en snijd in kleinere stukken.
  4. Doe de aardappelen, wortels en ui in een pan.
  5. Vul de pan met water en voeg een snufje zout toe.
  6. Kook dit voor 20-25 minuten.
  7. Giet het water af en stamp alles door elkaar.
  8. Roer de melk en boter erdoor en breng op smaak met zout en peper.
  9. Serveer met gehakballen en jus.

Method of preparation stew:

  1. Peel the potatoes and cut into equally sized pieces.
  2. Cut the onion into small pieces.
  3. Peel the carrots and cut into smaller pieces.
  4. Put the potatoes, onion and carrots in a pan.
  5. Fill the pan with water and add a pinch of salt.
  6. Cook for 20-25 minutes.
  7. Pour off the water and mash everything.
  8. Mix the milk and butter with the stew and season with salt and pepper.
  9. Serve with meatballs and gravy.

 

For desert we made a stroopwafelcake. This is the recipe:

Things you need:

Dutch English
200g Zachte boter 200g Soft butter
200g Suiker 200g Sugar
4 Eieren 4 Eggs
200g Bloem 200g Flour
2tl. Bakpoeder 2ts. Baking powder
2tl. Vanillesuiker 2ts. Vanilla sugar
2 Stroopwafels 2 Stroopwafels (Syrup waffles)
Snufje zout Pinch of Salt

 

Bereidingswijze stroopwafelcake:

  1. Roer de boter zacht en voeg de suiker toe.
  2. Roer totdat het luchtig is en voeg een voor een de eieren toe.
  3. Voeg al mixend de bloem, bakpoeder en zout toe.
  4. Breek de stroopwafels in kleine stukjes.
  5. Voeg de stroopwafel en vanillesuiker toe.
  6. Roer alles goed door elkaar.
  7. Vet de bakvorm in en giet het beslag in de vorm.
  8. Bak voor ongeveer 60 minuten op 180°C.

Method of Preparation stroopwafelcake:

  1. Mix the butter and add the sugar.
  2. Mix until it’s smooth and add the eggs one at a time.
  3. While mixing add the flour, baking powder and a pinch of salt.
  4. Break the stroopwafel in small pieces.
  5. Add the stroopwafel and the vanilla sugar.
  6. Mix everything together.
  7. Grease the baking mold and pour the batter into the mold.
  8. Bake at 180°C for about an hour.

 

The food this night was delicious, especially the stroopwafelcake! Unfortunately we both cut our finger, but it was definitely worth it! If you have some time, you should definitely try these recipes.

Bar night!

For our 6th meeting, Elisa and I decided to go to a bar. We really wanted to play some pool, so we went to Kivenheitto. It was extremely crowded for a weekday and because of that we couldn’t play pool. But there also was a Soccer table. This was really funny and I think in the end it was a draw.  Because it was really crowded, we decided to go to another bar. This was a really small one and to be honest I don’t know the name of this bar. While enjoying a drink and some live music, we talked about words to do with bar.

 

English

Finnish

Dutch

Could I have a beer please?

(Yksi) Olut, kiitos.

Mag ik een bier alstublieft?

How much does a beer costs?

Paljonko, oluk maksaa?

Hoeveel kost een biertje?

Beer

Olut or Kalja

Bier

Cider

Siirderi

Cider

Long drink

Lonkero

Long drink

Wine

Viini

Wijn

Water

Vesi

Water

Soda

Limsa

Frisdrank

Juice

Mehu

Sap

Coffee

Kahvi

Koffie

Tea

Tee

Thee

 

It was a pity that we couldn’t play some pool, but other than that it was a really nice night! I can’t wait till the next meeting.

 

Cheers/Kippis/Proost!

Let’s talk about education

Our fourth meeting was about the education systems. We met this time, how appropriate, at the university.

My expectations were that the Finnish and Dutch education system are pretty similar, but that was not the case. It’s totally different from each other.

The Finnish school system starts at age 6. Kids will start preschool. At age 7, kids will go to basic education. The basic educations has 9, sometimes 10 years. The 10th year is for those who need a little bit more time and for those who can’t decide what to do next. Most pupils are around 15 or 16 when they finish basic education.

After basic education, pupils can choose between Upper secondary school and Vocational school.

Upper secondary school

This is kind of similar to high school. This will take 3 years, and this is particularly theoretical education. Pupils will get different kinds of subjects and after Upper secondary school, Pupils can to vocational school, university of applied sciences or university.

Vocational school

Vocational school is a school for pupils who already kind of know what they want to become. This is particularly practical education, you can study for cook for example. This will take 3 years and after vocational school, pupils can look for a job and gain work experience, do another vocational qualification, go to university of applied sciences or go to university.

University of applied sciences

Most pupils are around 18 or 19 years old when they finish upper secondary school or vocational school. One of their options is going to the university of applied sciences. This will take 4 years and after finishing the university of applied sciences, you will get a Bachelor’s degree.  With a Bachelor degree and work experience, it’s possible to go for a Master’s degree.

University

The other option is going to the university. This will take 5 years. After the 3rd year, students will have their Bachelor degree. After the 5th year the students will get their Master’s degree. After getting a Master’s degree it’s possible to get a licentiate and a doctor’s degree.

 

A fun fact about the school system in Finland are the graduation caps. After graduating Upper secondary school, Finnish students will get a graduation cap.

Differences

Like I already said before, the Finnish education system differs a lot from the Dutch system. In the Netherlands, children will start school when they are 4 years old. They will start high school when they are about 12 years old.

Another really big difference between the systems is the fact that in the Netherlands, after elementary school, pupils will get classified on level. The level decides to what school they will go after high school.

It was really interesting to see the 2 education systems next to each other and it was also interesting that the systems differ a lot from each other. After seeing them next to each other I can’t say which system I think it’s better, because they both got their pro’s and con’s.

 

A nostalgic day

With our third meeting we decided to visit the Moomin museum. I was really excited, because the Moomins were definitely a part of my childhood. I always watched the tv show when I was younger.

The museum was really nice. You could grab a book at the entrance and the book was basically your guide. This was a good way of exploring a museum in my opinion. Elisa grabbed a Finnish book and I grabbed an English one and together we explored the museum. Elisa knew a lot more then I did, because she has read all of the books and I haven’t read them. This was good for me, because she was my second guide.

Another thing I really liked about the museum was the fact that a lot of scenes out of the books where created in an exhibition piece. Because of the books really came to live. It was also fun to hear the stories and looking at the exhibition piece at the same time.

The best piece in my opinion was the Moominhouse. There was one really big exhibition piece and that was a replica of the Moominhouse. This piece is absolutely beautiful, and the details are amazing. It felt like exploring a giant doll house.

Elisa and I both grew up with the Moomins, that’s why we decided to teach each other  the names of the characters in our mother tongue. In the following picture you can most of the characters with their Finnish and Dutch name.

 

 

We also did both a test called: Which Moomin character are you? You can do the test over here: https://www.moomin.com/en/which-moomin-are-you/     

 

According to the test I’m Moomintroll.

 

It was a really nostalgic day for us! It was awesome. If you are in Tampere, I recommend you to definitely visit the Moomin museum!