Tag Archives: EOTO

Consonant gradation for verbs

Today’s (8th October 2018) meeting was all about grammar.

Unfortunately, everyone had quite a busy schedule, so we decided to meet between our lectures at TAMK.

We focused mainly on the conjugation of verbs and therefore on the consonant gradation of Finnish verbs. When conjugating verbs, you also need to think of consonant gradation. Each verb type has its own rules. Of course, we also covered some German verbs which we found useful to know. It was interesting to see that the entire group seem to have at least a little fun while doing grammar (it’s obviously necessary to know some basic grammar, but it can also be enjoyable) – especially if you found some rules and repetition in different words/verbs.

I already know quite a lot verbs, especially the basics:  kirjoittaa, nukua, lukea, puhua, tehdä, käyttää, myydä, ostaa, oddotta, olla, opiskella, syödä, juosta, juoda, mennä, tulla, istua, asua, kysyä, katsoa, sanoa

Writing them down here makes me extra aware of how many verbs I already know by heart! That’s amazing! The easiest way for me to learn them is to remember to which verb-type they belong.

For example, the most common is Type 1, which ends with a vocal + ä/a (asua, istua, sanoa, kysyä …) this type is probably the easiest to conjugate since you only cut of the ä/a and add the ending of the person

asua → asu

asun / asut / hän asuu / me asumme / te asutte / he asuvat

It’s easy like that! I which everything of the Finnish grammar would stick in my head like that, but it’s still a long way to go. Anyway, even baby-steps will get me to a good level of Finnish in the future! 🙂

Chinese food with friends

Our third meeting was at Li’s home near Lukonmäki.

Li, Cui, Huang and Sisi had made some traditional chinese food because of their friends 20th birthday! Me and my boyfriend were invited to join also and it was so much fun! I was suprised how birthday party starts: first you sing, then birthday girl/boy blows away candle and then do somekind of prayer.

It was my first time eating chinese food; there were sushi, põ, tomatoes with sugar, pumpkin…  I feared they would be very spicy but suprisingly they were not. I really liked pumpkin and põ.

We discussed some table manners and differences between China-Finland. In China, the oldest person/-s start the dining, then the younger ones (grandparents->parents->you->your younger siblings). It’s done so to show respect to your elders. Dinners are also very lively in China while in Finland, you eat in silence because Ruokarauha (food peace?).

We also discussed dinners in diffrent holidays, traditional foods, table wear’s in finnish and chinese. I love how observant they are: they make good points that made me laugh when I realized how anti-social and shy we finnish people are.

Kuvan mahdollinen sisältö: teksti

Our Chinese friends made some very good questions I have to think through for our next meeting (like why finnish food is usually so salty, finnish small talk..)

Sauna & Swimming

On our 2nd meeting we went swimming and sauna to Kaleva’s uimahalli (Tampere swimming center). Even thought few of us had a little cold it was so much fun!

My boyfriend Toni came with us too to support and guide Lee, so he wouldn’t feel lonely. I was with Cui, Huang and Sisi (a new chinese friend!)

I was so proud of them how well they handled Sauna. We talked about swimming and relationships in Sauna before going to swim. I was suprised that they don’t swim in chinese schools.

After the swimming we sat down to cafeteria to learn few things. I taught them numbers from 10-20 and how numbers are formed (tens-ones) and family members.

I learned family members in chinese and learned there are diffrent pronounciation for A:  ā,  á, ǎ, à and a.  I also learned that chinese alphabets are not pronounced as they are written. Pronounciation is a clear problem for me xD.

We agreed to meet next sunday to have chinese home made dinner with them! I am anxiously waiting to eat some chinese!!

 

Tenth meeting: goodbyes

The last meeting. It was time to say goodbye. Since it was the last meeting, we decided not to take a topic like we had had before. We decided to talk about the course, what we had done and what have we possibly learned. We also talked about our plans and stuff, since we won’t be seeing each other anymore all that often, if ever.

This course has given me quite a lot. Before this, I knew literally nothing about Portugal. I had never heard the language or learned about portuguese culture. The whole country was a mystery to me. Now I know the basics of the language, although I’m having hard time trying to learn and remember it. I also know how they celebrate some holidays, what you can do there and stuff like that. And I think that I learned new things about Finland too during the course. When you have to teach stuff about this country, you got to know stuff about this country. And I don’t think I have thought about all these things that much before. I think I have taken all for granted before, or haven’t even realised some things. All in all, I had a blast during the whole course and I’m happy that I took it! Thank you Kaisa and Renata for being my group, a very good one, and for every meeting we had! This is the last you’ll hear from me in this blog I guess, so goodbye to everyone reading this also. And have a great summer you all!

Ninth meeting: proverbs

Yes, it was time for a fun topic again! We looked at some proverbs/idioms/whatever you like to call them and also tried to translate them – word to word. We have some crazy proverbs here in Finland, and we have tons of them. We had to pick some randomly, because going through all of them would have taken around a year or two maybe?

We found out that there are some same proverbs in Portuguese and Finnish, and those go to other languages too, like English. For example: early bird catches the worm. We all have our own versions of that one. But we also had some different ones and it was fun hearing them and especially teaching them – trying to explain what “Rakkaudesta se hevonenkin potkii” means.. I mean, the horse too is kicking because of love? Makes no sense like that! But it was fun to explain.

Eighth meeting: seasons

This time we talked about seasons. What are they like and things to do on each season. Before starting, I really didn’t even know if we have the same seasons. Like, do they have winter in Portugal? Apparently they do, but it’s like finnish summer. Which is so unfair. I want that sunny and warm weather too that they have there! Even though I like winter, snow and ice and everything – it’s cool. But it’s got to get warmer on summer, really. Oh and we also went through the months again, maybe I’ll even remember them soon.

 

I also learned that the rest of the seasons, spring, summer and autumn, are pretty similiar in Portugal. So it was quite difficult for Renata to come up with stuff to do in each season, when you can do same thing every month, every season. Our seasons differ quite much so me and Kaisa came up with some different things.

Seventh meeting: THE movies and TV-shows

Okay this time we thought that maybe we could take a topic that’s a little easier and maybe funnier. We (okay at least I) had had so much work to do so it was a great idea to do something like this. Sooo the topic of the meeting: the most finnish/portuguese movies and TV-shows we could come up with.  You know, those that you just must see. Even though we soon realised that we ourselves A. don’t know what are THE movies and TV-shows and B. after googling them realised we haven’t seem like half of them. But hey, it was still fun!

Okay on the top of our finnish list, I got to mention this. A true Finn has seen Tuntematon sotilas, which translates to Unknown soldier. A movie about a war against Russia, when Finland got its independence. And TV-shows, well the most iconic finnish TV-show has to be Salatut elämät, Secret lives in translation. Also learned that Portugal isn’t that big in the movie/TV-show industry. Not many big movies and the TV-shows were mostly soap operas (okay, what is finnish TV..). But very much reality shows! Thumbs up from me, love it.

Meeting 5: Barbecue!

The 5th time we met again in our favorite place, the Tribe Tampere workspace. One of the subjects we talked about on this day was the strangest food we ever ate and Monji “won” with the experience of eating whale meat. We finished this slightly disgusting talk and Monji invited us for a small barbecue party with some of his friends.

In the evening we followed his invitation to Rauhaniemi, it was the first time that I was grilling this year – the perfect start into the summer. Alisa and I were amazed when we saw Monji grilling with chopsticks, something that is just normal in Japan:

Four girls from China, Taiwan and Japan joined us there and together we had a great time on that evening.

 

Julia’s vocabulary:

barbecue das Grillen grilli
to grill grillen grillata
summer der Sommer kesä
sausage die Wurst; das Würstchen makkara

Meeting 4: The longest words

We splitted the fourth meeting into two because Monji was only able to meet on Thursday and Alisa only on Friday. For me both days were okay, so I first met Monji in TAMKO’s office where he told me that his Erasmus year is already ending in May. We talked about his future plans, he hopes that he can find a job in Germany before his Visa is running out and I think that based on his German skills he might have a chance.

The next day Alisa and I met again in the Tribe Tampere space where this time we were welcomed by a big fluffy dog!

After stroking him extensively we started to practice some Finnish and German. I tried to tell her from when to when I am going on holidays, but talking about dates in Finnish is still very hard for me.

 

I am in France until the 20th of August = Olen Ranskassa kahdeskymmenes elokuuta asti

Then we compared the longest words of our languages – and discovered that there is not much difference!

The longest Finnish word:

lentokonesuihkuturbiinimoottoriapumekaanikkoaliupseerioppilas (61 letters)

The longest German word:

Grund­stücks­ver­kehrs­ge­neh­mi­gungs­zu­stän­dig­keits­über­tra­gungs­ver­ord­nung (67 letters)

And of course, there exist a lot more ridiculously long words in both languages, for example epäjärjestelmällisyydestäänköhän and Rindfleischetikettierungsüberwachungsaufgabenübertragungsgesetz.

 

Julia’s vocabulary:

a dog ein Hund koira
cute süß söpö
paw eine Pfote tassu
to stroke streicheln silittää

 

 

Meeting 2: This grammar!

For our second meeting Alisa, Monji and I met at TAMK as it was the most convenient place because of our different schedules. During this session we practiced the German modal verbs which Alisa just learned in the German class.  At the same time, I could also revise these verbs in Finnish, whereby I have to admit that it is way easier in Finnish than in German because there are no irregularities in the conjugation and the sentence structure stays pretty much the same.

The structure of sentences was the next problem we were facing on this day. It seems like every word you add to a German sentence changes the whole order of the rest of the words. But after a while of translating various sentences, Alisa and Monji realized that if there are two verbs in one sentence, the second verb stands always at the end. And there are actually clear grammatical structures:

Julia’s vocabulary:

     
be allowed to dürfen saada
be able to; can können osata
have to; must müssen täytyä
be supposed to sollen pitää
want to wollen haluta
like to mögen tykätä