Tag Archives: Finland

Eight Meeting – Family and Relatives

We met at TAMK library again for this meeting. The topic for today is family members and other relationships. I already know most of them in Finnish but  I also learned some new ones.

I really enjoy the process of teaching Spanish, even more than learning Finnish. Sometimes I get very passionate about some topics and start explaining some curious words and grammar issues. I know that they are quite advance topics, but I am not pretending Janica and Getuar to learn them know, but just to make them awake that Spanish can be sometimes very tricky! For example baby in Spanish is “bebé”, but if you write “bebe” it means drink.

We have a lot of fun telling all the family members, Janica remembers a lot of them even when she stayed for a short time in Argentina! She says she is not good with languages but I don’t think so, I think she has a great capacity of learning and remembering!

These are some of the words we learned:
Finnish, Spanish, English:

Äiti, madre/mamá, mother.
Isä, padre/papá father.
Veli, hermano, brother.
Sisko, hermana, sister.
Isoäiti, abuela, grandmother.
Isoisä, abuelo, grandfather.
Täti, tía, aunt.
Setä, tío, uncle.
Vanhemmat, padres, parents.
Serkku, primos, cousins.
Tyttö, chica, girl.
Poika, chico, boy.
Ystävä, amigo/amiga, friend.
Tyttöystävä, novia, girlfriend.
Piokaystävä, novio, boyfriend.
Vauva, bebé, baby.

This was a really nice meeting, for the next ones we are planning to have a Christmas party at Janicas’s place and going to Vapriikki Museum.

Fifth Meeting – What time is it?

For this meeting we met at the Waffle Café again!

We learned about how to say the time. Telling the hour in Finnish is quite similar to English, but is Spanish it is slightly different. What we did was drawing some clocks with different cases and wrote the time in Finnish and Spanish. I think we need to practise a lot to learn it properly.

We learned the greetings we should say depending on the time of the day.

We also talked a bit about Lapland because I really want to go there this year. Getuar has never been there but Janica has worked there during Christmas season some time ago. So it was good that she could gave some tips 🙂

Third meeting – Learning numbers

For this meeting we went to Hesburguer because I really wanted to try Finnish junk food ;P we also had some discount coupons so we decided to use them.

The topic of the meeting were the numbers. I already learned them in my Basics of Finnish course but I thought it was good to remember them, and also Getuar don’t know the numbers in Spanish. We learned to count from 1 to 100. Janica remembered pretty well how to say numbers in Spanish.

They also told me that when people talk in Finnish they might say a shorter version of the numbers so I will be very aware when I go to the supermarket to recognize the numbers.

The meeting was very fun as we were eating hamburguers and also telling some stories about our lives.

 

First meeting – Coffee and introductions

Our first meet was held at Wayne’s Coffee, after some weeks of deliberation on when to meet. Initially we were a group of 5 people, but in the end just 3 of us remained: Janica, Getuar and me.

I arrived to the Coffee in the exact moment when Janica and Getuar was meeting each other in the line. I was a little bit nervous about the expectations they would have for learning Spanish. But I was relieved after meeting them. They are so nice!

The first thing we did was buying some coffee and sitting to introduce to each other, we have a very nice talk about who we are and what we do.

Janica is from Tampere and last semester she went to Argentina for a exchange, for me that was a relief because she is used to hear people speaking like me (for example uruguayan and argentinian people will pronounce the word ‘Yo’ as “Sho” instead of “Io”).

Getuar is from Espoo but he is studying at Tampere. Getuar is a triplet! so he has 2 sisters. He was born in Finland but his parents are from Albania. I really liked to hear about the story of his parents.

I told them that I am from Uruguay, from a city called Rivera which is located in the border with Brasil. In the other side of the border there is a Brazilian city called Santana do Livramento, and the only things that divide the two cities is a street and a park. You can cross freely from one country to the other whenever you want.

We started to learn basic vocabulary. We learned how to introduce ourselves, how to say hello/goodbye and some other useful phrases:


 

 

 

 

 

 

I really liked this meeting  because I was able to meet Janica and Getuar and also to learn some new vocabulary. I am looking forward for the next meeting.

Gabriela

8th meeting: Christmas traditions

IDEA

This time around we decided to go to see the opening of the Christmas market with Fruzsi and Boti in Keskustori and talk about our Christmas traditions.

ORGANIZING

We did not have any bigger plans for this meeting, just to meet up, walk around the market and see where the conversation would end up. Actually, meeting in the Christmas market was a good idea in a sense that we were able to see the things we were talking about in real and we also found new topics to talk about when seeing things.

LEARNING

However, ones again we realized that our cultures are rather similar to each other. There are no so many differences when it comes to the decorations, food or giving presents. It seems that those traditions are either Christian or European, and therefore common for us all.

The biggest differences we were able to name was that in Hungary it is not Santa Claus, who brings the presents on 24th of December, but baby Jesus. Even so, also kids in Hungary do believe to Santa Claus. He visits on 6th of December.

Another difference, though a very small one, is that in Hungary it is normal to hung candies to the Christmas tree whereas in Finland it is rather rare according to me.

Finnish traditions and holidays

This time Elisa and I drank some coffee, tea & chocolate cake and we talked about something that really interest me: Finnish traditions. First, I taught Elisa about some Dutch traditions and after that she told me about Finnish traditions. It’s funny that the traditions are so different but also a little bit the same.

Loppiainen/Epiphany

The first Finnish tradition we talked about was Loppiainen or Epiphany. This takes place on the 6th of January. This is basically the day when they take their Christmas decorations away.

Palm Sunday

Palm Sunday takes place the Sunday before Easter. On this day kids dress up as witches and the pick out a tree branches. The kids decorate the tree branches with feathers. They will go from door to door to say a poem to wish the people good health. In exchange for saying that poem they will get some candy. This holiday kind of reminds me of the Dutch holiday Sint Maarten.

Vappu/Laborday

Vappu is on the 1st of May, but the celebration last for a week. This is a communistic celebration. In Tampere there is a market at central square. During this holiday there is also a lot of nonsense stuff like a lot of balloons and fart pillows. A lot of people will drink champagne and make their own sima. There is also a lot of food like Munkkis.

Last eve of April

On the last eve of April, a lot of young people will go out and drink all night. They always put a hat on the maid of Finland statue.

Juhannus/Midsummer

Juhannus is an ancient Finnish holiday. It always takes place on the Saturday between the 20th and 26th of June. The main festivals during this holiday take place on Thursdays. A lot of Finnish people will go to their cabins in the forest and celebrate it over there. In Tampere there is a festival called Underground Midsummer. There is always a bonfire and there are dances. For example, the midsummer dance. There is also a myth that if you put seven different flowers on your pillow, you will see your future husband in your dreams. This is something some of the younger girls do.

All Saints day

This day takes place on the 1st of November. A lot of people go to the cemetery this day to light a candle.

Independence Day – Suomi sata

Finnish Independence Day is on the 6th of December. This year it’s a really special year for Finland, because Finland exists 100 years this year. In 1917 was the independence of Finland from the Russian republic. Before being a part of Russia, Finland was a part of Sweden. During Independence Day there will be a reception where the president and famous people shake hands.

 

New Year’s Eve

On the 31th of December it’s New Year’s Eve in Finland. This means fireworks and getting drunk. Some people will melt a horseshoe and the shape will predict the next year.

It was really interesting to hear about the Finnish holidays and traditions. Like I said before, some of them I celebrate as well, but there are also a few holidays I have had never heard of before.

 

 

 

 

Let’s talk about education

Our fourth meeting was about the education systems. We met this time, how appropriate, at the university.

My expectations were that the Finnish and Dutch education system are pretty similar, but that was not the case. It’s totally different from each other.

The Finnish school system starts at age 6. Kids will start preschool. At age 7, kids will go to basic education. The basic educations has 9, sometimes 10 years. The 10th year is for those who need a little bit more time and for those who can’t decide what to do next. Most pupils are around 15 or 16 when they finish basic education.

After basic education, pupils can choose between Upper secondary school and Vocational school.

Upper secondary school

This is kind of similar to high school. This will take 3 years, and this is particularly theoretical education. Pupils will get different kinds of subjects and after Upper secondary school, Pupils can to vocational school, university of applied sciences or university.

Vocational school

Vocational school is a school for pupils who already kind of know what they want to become. This is particularly practical education, you can study for cook for example. This will take 3 years and after vocational school, pupils can look for a job and gain work experience, do another vocational qualification, go to university of applied sciences or go to university.

University of applied sciences

Most pupils are around 18 or 19 years old when they finish upper secondary school or vocational school. One of their options is going to the university of applied sciences. This will take 4 years and after finishing the university of applied sciences, you will get a Bachelor’s degree.  With a Bachelor degree and work experience, it’s possible to go for a Master’s degree.

University

The other option is going to the university. This will take 5 years. After the 3rd year, students will have their Bachelor degree. After the 5th year the students will get their Master’s degree. After getting a Master’s degree it’s possible to get a licentiate and a doctor’s degree.

 

A fun fact about the school system in Finland are the graduation caps. After graduating Upper secondary school, Finnish students will get a graduation cap.

Differences

Like I already said before, the Finnish education system differs a lot from the Dutch system. In the Netherlands, children will start school when they are 4 years old. They will start high school when they are about 12 years old.

Another really big difference between the systems is the fact that in the Netherlands, after elementary school, pupils will get classified on level. The level decides to what school they will go after high school.

It was really interesting to see the 2 education systems next to each other and it was also interesting that the systems differ a lot from each other. After seeing them next to each other I can’t say which system I think it’s better, because they both got their pro’s and con’s.

 

6th meeting: A quick visit to Vapriikki

For our sixth meeting we decided to see each other in Vapriikki to go to the National History Museum, since we had been talking about moose and deer flies during our last meeting. So, why only to talk, since you are also able to see! As we decided to go on Friday after 17pm, we did not have to pay for the fee, which was very convenient.

As it was about the Finnish nature and animals, I tried to explain Fruzsi and Boti some interesting facts about them. However, during our conversations I realized that Hungary is rather similar to Finland, when it comes to nature and animals. Not so many differences there. However, Fruzsi and Boti told me about some flying insects that do glow while flying, and I don’t think we have such.

For me the biggest outcome of this meeting was to have a nice continuum for the last meeting. To take one thing from a level of words a step up to something concrete. I personally love it when one thing leads to another. Also, since I last time got so exited about the image of a rural Hungarian village with interesting traditional events, I would now very much like to visit one, especially, if they have flying and glowing insects.

The picture above is from a movie The Princess and the Frog by Disney.

Food night!

For our second meeting, the theme was food. We decided to cook some food together. I’m not a really good cook, so I was glad Elisa wrote down two reci

pes.

The first thing we made was makaronilaatikko, macaroni casserole or macaroni ovenschotel.

Things you need:

Finnish English Dutch
5 dl makaronia 5 dl macaroni 5 dl macaroni
1 kpl sipulia 1 pcs onion 1 ui
1 rkl rypsiöljyä 1 tbsp rapeseed oil 1 el koolzaad olie
400 g jauhelihaa 400 g minced meat 400 gr gehakt
2 kpl kananmunaa 2 pcs eggs 2  eieren
5 dl maitoa 5 dl milk 500 ml melk
½ tl suolaa ½ tsp salt ½ tl zout
¼ tl mustapippuria ¼ tsp black pepper ¼ tl zwarte peper

 

What to do:

  1. Keitö makaronit.
  2. Kuori ja pilko sipuli.
  3. Kuullota sipulit ölyssä.
  4. Paista jauheliha.
  5. Lisää sipuli jauhelihan joukkoon.
  6. Sekoita jauheliha – sipuli seos makaronien joukkoon.
  7. Vatkaa kananmunat.
  8. Lisää mausteet ja maito kanonmunien joukkoon.
  9. Kaada munamaito vuokaan.
  10. Paista 175 °C noin tunti.

 

  1. Cook the macaroni.
  2. Peel and cut the onion.
  3. Fry the onions in the oil.
  4. Fry the minced meat.
  5. Add the onions to the minced meat.
  6. Mix it with the macaroni.
  7. Scramble the eggs.
  8. Add spices and milk to the eggs.
  9. Pour the eggmilk to the pan.
  10. Cook at 175 °C for about an hour.

 

  1. Kook de macaroni.
  2. Pel en snij de ui.
  3. Braad de ui in de olie.
  4. Braad het gehakt.
  5. Voeg de uien toe aan het gehakt.
  6. Mix dit met de macaroni.
  7. Roer de eieren door elkaar.
  8. Voeg de specerijen en de melk toe aan de eieren.
  9. Giet het eiermelk in de pan.
  10. Bak het in de oven op 175 °C voor ongeveer een uur.

 

 

The second recipe is Mustikkapiirakka (it’s easier to bake than to pronounce)/blueberry pie/bosbessen tart.

Things you need for the pohja/dough/deeg:

Finnish English Dutch
150 g voita 150 g butter 150 gr boter
1,5 dl sokeria 1,5 dl sugar 1,5 dl suiker
1 kananmuna 1 egg 1 ei
3 dl vehnäjauhpja 3 dl flour 3 dl bloem
1 tl vaniliinisokeria 1 tbs vanilla sugar 1 el vanilla suiker
1 tl leivinjauhetta 1 tbs baking powder 1 el bakpoeder
400 g mustikoita 400 g blueberries 400 gr bosbessen

 

Things you need for the murutaikina/short pastry/zanddeeg:

Finnish English Dutch
50 g voita 50 g butter 50 gr boter
0,5 dl sokeria 0,5 dl sugar 0,5 dl suiker
1 dl vehnäjauhoja 1 dl flour 1 dl bloem

 

What to do:

  1. Sekoita sokeri ja pehmeä voi.
  2. Lisää muut aineet ja sekoita tasaiseksi.
  3. Levitä taikina vuokaan.
  4. Kaada mustikat vuokaan tasaiesti.
  5. Valmista murutaikina ja levitä se mustikoiden päälle.
  6. Paista 200 °C noin 30 minuuttia.
  7. Tarjoile jäätelön kahssa.

 

  1. Mix sugar and softened butter.
  2. Add the rest of the ingredients and mix evenly.
  3. Spread the dough into the pan.
  4. Pour the blueberries evenly into the pan.
  5. Mix together the short pastry ingredients, and spread it on the blueberries.
  6. Cook at 200 °C fora bout 30 minutes.
  7. Serve with ice cream.

 

  1. Mix de suiker met de zachte boter.
  2. Voeg de rest van de ingrediënten toe en mix tot een glad geheel.
  3. Leg het deeg in het bakblik.
  4. Giet de bosbessen in het bakblik.
  5. Mix de ingrediënten voor het zanddeeg en spreid dit over de bosbessen.
  6. Bak op 200 °C voor ongeveer 30 minuten.
  7. Serveer met ijs.

 

It was a really fun and delicious evening! My favorite was the blueberry pie, it was amazing, especially with the ice cream. If you have free time, you should definitely try to make it!

4th meeting: ABC and AA’BC

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This time around we did teach each other our alphabets.  To me this was rather interesting as I was thinking of using the Hungarian alphabets for an art project later on.

However, our first realization was that in the Hungarian alphabet there are a way more letters than in the Finnish alphabet. We counted that in total Hungarians have 44 letters and we Finns 29. This was partly explained so that in Hungary they don’t really use letter

Y,

but they combine it with other letters to form such letters as

GY, LY, NY and TY.

In the Hungarian language they also have such combined letters as

DZ, DZS, SZ and ZS,

which all were really strange to me, who has got used to it that one letter is only one letter – not 3 letters together.  So, to me the Hungarian letters were kind of beyond understanding, which actually made learning them lots of fun.

We also did talk about it that neither in Hungarian language all the letters are equally important, but there are some 4 that they hardly use. Though, on the same time, some letters seems to be almost too popular. If you only look at the alphabet, there are 2 x A, 2 x E, 4 x O and 4 x U, even if you, of course, pronounce them differently.

In Fruzsi’s blog post you are able to see the entire alphabets.