Tag Archives: Finnish-German

My Final Course Meeting FIN-GER

In my last official meeting to finish the course we talked a bit about everything. Everyone is different and faced different difficulties over the time. I can motivate myself quite well to go into verb conjugation and learning phrases and vocabulary. But I do need some help with the local cases, when it comes to the “open places” not everything is as clear as I would want it to be. The consonant graduation is also something I still struggle with every now and then (especially when you combine my two “problem fields” of the Finnish language 😉) For example: NK – NG; sänky – sängyt – sängyssä BUT sänkyyn. [Liisa nukkuu sängyssä. / Minä menen sänkyyn.]

And this is when I’m happy to have (at least) two lovely Finns by my side who can help me with figuring out why things are like this. In this case there wasn’t really an explanation why the consonant graduation doesn’t apply, so I take it as given. It’s just like Helsingissä and Helsinkiin. Someone decided that it’s like this. I just need to remember and learn it this way. 😀

Review:

My Finnish has improved considerably since the start of the EOTO course (or coming to Finland in general) – as I would have hoped. While I still feel that I am obviously still floundering in the basics, I do now have a reasonable grasp of the grammar and my vocabulary has grown and grown. I can now construct very basic sentences. While the grammar is often not quite right, the message in the sentence can usually be understood. Moreover, I have memorised a few little phrases (which makes it sound like I know a lot more than I do!) and I really should build on those and increase them. As my vocabulary has grown, I’ve become more familiar with the grammar. I am finding that reading Finnish is getting easier: I am able to pull more and more out of passages of text. I also got a Finnish book from the TAMKO Office which functions as motivation that someday (maybe in a year) I will be able to read it and understand the general message of it. Besides learning the language, I also learned more and more about Finns and their culture. I realized that when I got more familiar with the language. I think you can’t get into the Finnish culture if you don’t have a reasonable idea about how the Finnish language works. I enjoyed this journey a lot and when I return home at the end of December, I will surely continue my Finnish studies! 😊

9th Meeting: FIN-GER Pre-Christmas-Dinner-Party

Yesterday we continued our language learning journey at Hanna’s place. Hanna made a “finntastic” ham-cheese-pie for us which we enjoyed in a relaxed atmosphere while there were soft Christmas songs played and us having a good conversation about what has happened over the last week. It’s really nice because meeting on Monday and therefore, starting the week with our EOTO get-together has almost became a tradition over the last couple of weeks.

Bildergebnis für Finland christmas time tampere

Now, that it’s nearly December and the semester is ending soon we decided to give it a go and see how far we have come. Every one of us gave the others in their target language an overview of oneself. It’s great to see that we all managed to learn good pronunciation and some basic language skills as well. I’m really sad, that our time in Tampere is almost over and so is this course. It’s been a good decision to join the course, even if I was a little late. 😀 I met three wonderful people and learned a lot the Finnish language and about Finland on the way. I will surely continue learning and hopefully coming back to Finland in the future. If I return it’s hopefully not just for holidays but maybe for a lifetime.

Meeting 5: Barbecue!

The 5th time we met again in our favorite place, the Tribe Tampere workspace. One of the subjects we talked about on this day was the strangest food we ever ate and Monji “won” with the experience of eating whale meat. We finished this slightly disgusting talk and Monji invited us for a small barbecue party with some of his friends.

In the evening we followed his invitation to Rauhaniemi, it was the first time that I was grilling this year – the perfect start into the summer. Alisa and I were amazed when we saw Monji grilling with chopsticks, something that is just normal in Japan:

Four girls from China, Taiwan and Japan joined us there and together we had a great time on that evening.

 

Julia’s vocabulary:

barbecue das Grillen grilli
to grill grillen grillata
summer der Sommer kesä
sausage die Wurst; das Würstchen makkara

Meeting 4: The longest words

We splitted the fourth meeting into two because Monji was only able to meet on Thursday and Alisa only on Friday. For me both days were okay, so I first met Monji in TAMKO’s office where he told me that his Erasmus year is already ending in May. We talked about his future plans, he hopes that he can find a job in Germany before his Visa is running out and I think that based on his German skills he might have a chance.

The next day Alisa and I met again in the Tribe Tampere space where this time we were welcomed by a big fluffy dog!

After stroking him extensively we started to practice some Finnish and German. I tried to tell her from when to when I am going on holidays, but talking about dates in Finnish is still very hard for me.

 

I am in France until the 20th of August = Olen Ranskassa kahdeskymmenes elokuuta asti

Then we compared the longest words of our languages – and discovered that there is not much difference!

The longest Finnish word:

lentokonesuihkuturbiinimoottoriapumekaanikkoaliupseerioppilas (61 letters)

The longest German word:

Grund­stücks­ver­kehrs­ge­neh­mi­gungs­zu­stän­dig­keits­über­tra­gungs­ver­ord­nung (67 letters)

And of course, there exist a lot more ridiculously long words in both languages, for example epäjärjestelmällisyydestäänköhän and Rindfleischetikettierungsüberwachungsaufgabenübertragungsgesetz.

 

Julia’s vocabulary:

a dog ein Hund koira
cute süß söpö
paw eine Pfote tassu
to stroke streicheln silittää

 

 

Meeting 2: This grammar!

For our second meeting Alisa, Monji and I met at TAMK as it was the most convenient place because of our different schedules. During this session we practiced the German modal verbs which Alisa just learned in the German class.  At the same time, I could also revise these verbs in Finnish, whereby I have to admit that it is way easier in Finnish than in German because there are no irregularities in the conjugation and the sentence structure stays pretty much the same.

The structure of sentences was the next problem we were facing on this day. It seems like every word you add to a German sentence changes the whole order of the rest of the words. But after a while of translating various sentences, Alisa and Monji realized that if there are two verbs in one sentence, the second verb stands always at the end. And there are actually clear grammatical structures:

Julia’s vocabulary:

     
be allowed to dürfen saada
be able to; can können osata
have to; must müssen täytyä
be supposed to sollen pitää
want to wollen haluta
like to mögen tykätä

 

Meeting 1: Talking about the time

Our first real meeting was in the Cafeteria of TAMK, but unfortunately only three of us had time on that day.

In the beginning we practiced talking about the time, which is a really important subject in Germany. I can confirm the stereotype that Germans are always on time and that being late is considered unpolite. Of course, not every German is like this, but in general it is true. Me for example, I am always at least ten minutes too early and get very annoyed if I am running late.

When we were practicing I was also able to revise the Finnish expressions, which was a good exercise for me because I didn’t talk about the time in Finnish for a longer while.

Practicing the time in German online: http://www.lehrerlenz.de/die_uhrzeit2.html
Practising the time in Finnish online: http://venla.info/exercise-time.php

 

Julia’s vocabulary:

The time

     
The time Die Uhrzeit Kellonaika
What is the time? Wie spät ist es?

Wie viel Uhr ist es?

Mitä kello on?

Kuinka paljon kello on?

It is… (one) o’clock. Es ist… (ein) Uhr. Kello on… (yksi).
It is half past…(twelve). Es ist halb… (eins). Kello on puoli… (yksi).
It is quarter to… (one). Es ist viertel vor… (eins). Kello on varttia vaille… (yksi).
It is quarter past… (one). Es ist viertel nach… (eins). Kello on varttia yli… (yksi).
It is five minutes to… (one). Es ist fünf Minuten vor… (eins). Kello on viisi minuuttia vaille… (yksi).
It is five minutes past… (one). Es ist fünf Minuten nach… (eins). Kello on viisi minuuttia yli… (yksi).
At what time? Um wie viel Uhr? Moneltako?
At… (one) o’clock.

At… (one).

Um… (ein) Uhr.

Um… (eins).

Kello… (yksi).

Yhdeltä.

At half past… (twelve). Um halb… (eins). Puoli yhdeltä.

 

 

Getting to know each other

Hello Everyone! First of all, I would like to give you a short introduction about myself.

My name is Julia and I’m a 20 years old girl from South Germany. I am currently a first-year student of International Business and I am living for about one year and a half in Finland. Before I started to study, I was working as au pair in a Finnish family from where I already got the basics of the Finnish language.

The “Each One Teach One” course is a great opportunity to practice my Finnish skills, especially the speaking in which I am not confident yet.

When our German-Finnish group met for the first time, it was Liebe auf den ersten Blick – love at first sight. But at the same time, we were also facing a problem: With five people our group is the biggest group of the course and in addition I am the only German in there.

Despite everything we believed that we would figure out how to arrange our future meetings so that everyone would be able to meet with me at least ten times.

So, during our first (unofficial) meeting we were presenting ourselves, talking about our language levels and what we wish to achieve during the course. We also tried to come up with ideas where we could meet and what we could do together.

The people in our group are very kind and funny and I am looking forward to our meetings!

 

Julia’s vocabulary:

Getting to know each other

     
Hello/Hi Hallo/Hi Moi/Hei
How are you? Wie geht es dir? Mitä kuuluu?
I’m fine. Mir geht es gut. Hyvää kuuluu.
What is your name? Wie heißt du? Mikä sinun nimi on?
My name is… Ich heiße… Minun nimi on…
Nice to meet you! Schön dich kennenzulernen! Hauska tutustua!
Where are you from? Woher kommst du? Mistä sinä olet kotoisin?
I am from… (Germany) Ich komme aus… (Deutschland) Olen kotoisin … (Saksasta)
Where do you live? Wo wohnst du? Missä sinä asut?
I live in… (Finland) Ich wohne in… (Finnland) Asun… (suomessa)
Which languages do you speak? Welche Sprachen sprichst du? Mitä kieliä sinä puhut?
I speak… (English) Ich spreche… (Englisch) Puhun… (englantia)
I don’t speak… (Swedish) Ich spreche kein… (Schwedisch) En puhu… (ruotsia)

9th Meeting: Wildlife and Translating

9.11.2017

On the sixth meeting I went through Daniel’s presentation for his Finnish course. It was funny to notice how little I know about Finnish grammar rules. It was at some points impossible to explain why we say something in certain way. “Because it just sounds better” or “it’s easier to pronounce this way” where my most used sentences when asked why some words or sentences are structured that way. I think Daniel knows more about the “why” than I do.

After going through the Finnish homework we started to talk about wildlife in Germany and Finland. We do have a lot of same animals but the ratio of them is so different. We have quite a lot of wolves in Finland but in Germany they have just started migrating back. In Finland it’s common to hear about cars crashing with a moose. But in Germany you are more likely to crash to a deer or a herd of wild boars .  Daniel told me that there’s actually a herd of wild boar in the city of Berlin and they cause nuisance in one of the parks.

Wild boars in Tegel, Berlin

8th Meeting: Independence Day

6.12.2017

Our ninth meeting took place in the Keskustori. We walked through the people and wandered around the Christmas market. We talked about Christmas traditions in our countries.

The main reason for the meeting of course was the independence day’s festivities. We listened to the music and talked about my feelings and Daniel’s knowledge of Finland’s independence. Because Daniel had gone through the independence day vocabulary in his Finnish course we had the conversation in German. The event got a nice ending with the Finlandia hymn and amazing fireworks.

 

Hyvää itsenäisyyspäivää Suomi! Happy Independence Day Finland!

7th Meeting: Forestry Vocabulary

27.11.2017

For this meeting we decided to go through some vocabulary I need if I ever want to live and work on my field in Germany. We went through words in German and Finnish that had something to do with forestry. This was a good exercise  for both of us. I got to learn the German words and Daniel got to learn the Finnish words. Here’s some of them:

  • mänty = die Pinie = pine
  • avohakkuu = der Kahlschlag = clear-cutting
  • istuttaa = pflanzen = to plant
  • harvennus = die Ausdünnung = thinning
  • pienaukkojen laajentaminen = Femelschlag = the expansion of small openings in a forest

It was frustrating to notice how little I could remember these forestry words in English. This meeting made me brush up my English vocabulary with the German.