Tag Archives: Finnish

Tenth meeting: goodbyes

The last meeting. It was time to say goodbye. Since it was the last meeting, we decided not to take a topic like we had had before. We decided to talk about the course, what we had done and what have we possibly learned. We also talked about our plans and stuff, since we won’t be seeing each other anymore all that often, if ever.

This course has given me quite a lot. Before this, I knew literally nothing about Portugal. I had never heard the language or learned about portuguese culture. The whole country was a mystery to me. Now I know the basics of the language, although I’m having hard time trying to learn and remember it. I also know how they celebrate some holidays, what you can do there and stuff like that. And I think that I learned new things about Finland too during the course. When you have to teach stuff about this country, you got to know stuff about this country. And I don’t think I have thought about all these things that much before. I think I have taken all for granted before, or haven’t even realised some things. All in all, I had a blast during the whole course and I’m happy that I took it! Thank you Kaisa and Renata for being my group, a very good one, and for every meeting we had! This is the last you’ll hear from me in this blog I guess, so goodbye to everyone reading this also. And have a great summer you all!

Ninth meeting: proverbs

Yes, it was time for a fun topic again! We looked at some proverbs/idioms/whatever you like to call them and also tried to translate them – word to word. We have some crazy proverbs here in Finland, and we have tons of them. We had to pick some randomly, because going through all of them would have taken around a year or two maybe?

We found out that there are some same proverbs in Portuguese and Finnish, and those go to other languages too, like English. For example: early bird catches the worm. We all have our own versions of that one. But we also had some different ones and it was fun hearing them and especially teaching them – trying to explain what “Rakkaudesta se hevonenkin potkii” means.. I mean, the horse too is kicking because of love? Makes no sense like that! But it was fun to explain.

Eighth meeting: seasons

This time we talked about seasons. What are they like and things to do on each season. Before starting, I really didn’t even know if we have the same seasons. Like, do they have winter in Portugal? Apparently they do, but it’s like finnish summer. Which is so unfair. I want that sunny and warm weather too that they have there! Even though I like winter, snow and ice and everything – it’s cool. But it’s got to get warmer on summer, really. Oh and we also went through the months again, maybe I’ll even remember them soon.

 

I also learned that the rest of the seasons, spring, summer and autumn, are pretty similiar in Portugal. So it was quite difficult for Renata to come up with stuff to do in each season, when you can do same thing every month, every season. Our seasons differ quite much so me and Kaisa came up with some different things.

Seventh meeting: THE movies and TV-shows

Okay this time we thought that maybe we could take a topic that’s a little easier and maybe funnier. We (okay at least I) had had so much work to do so it was a great idea to do something like this. Sooo the topic of the meeting: the most finnish/portuguese movies and TV-shows we could come up with.  You know, those that you just must see. Even though we soon realised that we ourselves A. don’t know what are THE movies and TV-shows and B. after googling them realised we haven’t seem like half of them. But hey, it was still fun!

Okay on the top of our finnish list, I got to mention this. A true Finn has seen Tuntematon sotilas, which translates to Unknown soldier. A movie about a war against Russia, when Finland got its independence. And TV-shows, well the most iconic finnish TV-show has to be Salatut elämät, Secret lives in translation. Also learned that Portugal isn’t that big in the movie/TV-show industry. Not many big movies and the TV-shows were mostly soap operas (okay, what is finnish TV..). But very much reality shows! Thumbs up from me, love it.

Sixth meeting: time

On our sixth meeting we talked about time, so it was mostly about vocabulary. Useful words, some numbers (only in Portuguese of course since Renata already knew numbers in Finnish), times of day or whatever they are called, then a little larger amounts of time like months and so on.  Oh and also the most useful phrases when talking about time, for example “What time is it?”.

Portuguese names for months were pretty similiar to the English ones – that was a relief. I mean, the language has been so damn hard to get into, so it was nice to have something that was quite simple. Other words around time, like a minute or a second, were also quite similiar. Like in Finnish too. But yeah without any further wondering, this meeting was again very useful if I ever travel to Portugal (okay, also if I ever learn the language… So difficult!).

Fifth meeting: Groceries

At our next meeting, the fifth one, we discussed about some vocabulary again. This time it was groceries, so we made it simple and made shopping lists thinking about the basic things that you buy when you go to a grocery store.

Since it was about vocabulary, I ran into the same problem again with learning Portuguese: there is so freaking much to remember. How to pronounce, how to write, how does this exact word work on a phrase and so on. Even with simple things like saying one word aloud, you have to know how to do it. Ok, you have to do that in English and Swedish also, but somehow they don’t seem all that hard, but quite simple instead.

Obviously this topic is quite useful – it’s good to know what different foods are called if you ever go to Portugal. I still can’t remember the pronouncing things, so I’m just gonna have to stutter the word like it’s written and hope that the one listening to me will understand what I mean. But anyways: very useful, good meeting. I wonder what we’ll come up with next.

Fourth meeting: Holidays!

This one was one of the most interesting topics for me: how we celebrate the biggest holidays of the year. So in our fourth meeting we discussed about three major holidays: Christmas, Easter and New Years. The point was to see how the ways to celebrate these holidays are different, or if they are the same. I honestly knew nothing about how they celebrate these holidays in Portugal but I had a feeling that it wouldn’t be the same. We talked about traditional foods we enjoy on holidays and also traditions themselves.

 

While thinking about what to tell about Finnish traditions we thought that it’s kinda hard since everyone has their own traditions. For example, we really don’t have traditions for Easter. But we managed to come up with some common ones to tell Renata about. It was interesting to hear about these holidays in Portugal. For example the foods they eat at Christmas – can’t even imagine some of them. We also  went through some vocabulary about these holidays, like how to wish “Merry Christmas” in both Finnish and Portuguese.

 

Like I said in the beginning, I found this topic quite interesting. I’d like to see and experience these holiday celebrations in foreign countries myself. I mean, I love Finnish traditions with all my heart and woudln’t change my Christmas for anything in the world, but still. It would be kinda cool to see how different it can really be.

Third meeting: Basic language

In our third meeting we discussed about some basic language stuff. We learned how to say hi and goodbye, how to introduce yourself and so on – basically the things you need for Portuguese small talk if you ever travel to Portugal. Since Renata already knew the most basic things in Finnish, we came up with something else instead, starting with different animals. Then we tried to gather some useful phrases in Finnish, like how to tell whether you like something or not. And then colours. So this meeting was all about the basics of each others language.

 

I learned that Portuguese is pretty damn dissicult. There is all this stuff about having to know whether the word is feminine or masculine or something? And then it effects the way you use it in a phrase. Then there is like a million ways to pronounce things and different letters combined mean some weird sounds in the middle of the word. We went through how you say each word but honestly I’m forgetting most of it in seconds since there’s so much to learn – can’t keep everything in my head. Oh and also there are different markings above the letters and they also make the letter sound different. I’m really starting to love how Finnish is pronounced exactly like you write it.

 

But yeah, this meeting was definetely full of stuff. I got so much new information about Portuguese that it’ll probably take weeks to figure all this out, if I even can. Thank god for simple pronouncing, Finnish language I love you.

2nd meeting

Now there is only three students in our group. Our second meeting was also at Tamk with Julia (German) and Monji (Japan). We talked about the articles kein and keinen and also about modal verbs. We translated sentences from German to English , German to Finnish and Finnish to German. I talked with Julia in Finnish and she is very good already, with minor mistakes.

My vocabulary of the day:

Mögen = to like/may

Dürfen = be allowed to/may

Können = be able to/can

Müssen = to have to/must

Sollen = to ought to/should

Wollen = to want to

Alisa Lätti

Second meeting: School systems

Hello all, it’s Tiiu again (I mean really again, since I’m writing this straight after my last post). Our second meeting took place at Tamk. We had decided to talk about school systems and how theyare different, so what would have been better place to do it? I didn’t really know what to expect about the portuguese school system. Like, do they have similiar grades as we do here in Finland? Is it nothing like the finnish school system? I found the subject quite interesting – of course, since it’s quite close to me, being a student. It was both difficult and easy at the same time to explain the finnish school system – there are not many dimensions to it but then again, if the other person knows nothing about it beforehand, it can be hard. Also I really had to practise my english school vocabulary, all the words were lost. Luckily I had Kaisa there so we could fill each others phrases when the words didn’t come to mouth.

 

So, we went with this quite simple model of finnish school system. We, me and Kaisa, had a little difficulties to find the right words for these different “phases” of finnish school system. It’s kinda hard since the words are from english-speaking countries and they have quite different systems there. Anyhow, we explained shortly which schools (or other institutions like that) are mandatory and which are not and a little bit about what happens in each of them (like the grades). We also told and wrote down every phase in finnish – so it was not only about the system but also about the language. We also discussed about grades in rating and found some differences in finnish and portuguese grading system.

Renata walked us through the same stuff in portuguese school system. There were some similarities, but not very obvious ones. You really had to take a proper look to see them. She also did the same, told and wrote the portuguese words for school and grade and others. It was a lot of information and I think I’m gonna have to take a little time to figure it all out or even just to remember all it. But it was interesting for sure!