Tag Archives: Finns

Alku aina hankala. ♥ Aller Anfang ist schwer.

My second „Each One Teach One” meeting, this time with the entire group, took place at “Pella’s Café”. Now that it’s getting slightly colder after a great summer we decided to meet in a cosier place than we did the last time.

We continued our learning with Vocabulary/Phrases lists about clothes, weather, body and transport. For this matter, Antero prepared a list with words he thought would be important. Melanie and I helped our German learners with the right German translations. It was interesting to see that some words sounded or looked similar in either English-German [jacket – Jacke] or German-Finnish [Hose – housut]. Some words lead to beaming smiles on the Finnish faces just like “Handschuh” [gloves]. Yes, we Germans put ‘shoes’ for our hands on, when it’s getting cold outside! 😉

Besides learning new words, it was interesting to me that Finns talk differently about the weather. The German language has specific words for specific actions related to weather while the Finnish language uses terms like “it’s raining snow”[sataa lunta] for “it’s snowing”.

Mielenkiintoinen !!

While exchanging our languages I enjoyed the relaxed atmosphere we shared in the group which also lead to some interest from locals. Some seemed to be quite interested when the Finns started to say German words and vice versa.

Furthermore, we decided to meet every Monday from now on since this day suits us the most. Apart from the Monday, we try to find a second date per week. For next Monday everyone will come up with a few verbs he/she would like to learn. Our next meeting will be a “Finnish lesson” since we focused this time more on German. 😊

Näkemiin!!

 

‘True Finns’, the 7th meeting

We had our seventh meeting on April 23rd in O’Connells. There was a stand-up show called ‘True Finns’ which concentrated basically in making fun of Finnish habits and stereotyphical manners. The elections had just been on the last week so they spoke quite a lot about politics and then later on about Vappu which was just around the corner.

In my opinion this was quite a funny way to learn about Finnish culture and habits. The hosts were good and show was surprisingly funny actually. In the end I was happy that we chose to go there. Comparing then Finnish and German cultures based on stand-up was easier than I expected and it was good to talk about the cultural differences for a change.

The language is a part of the culture and therefore in my opinion it is good to understand and know something about the way of life to be able to have an understanding where the language is coming from. For example, in Finnish there are several words for snow and we can name ‘types of snow’ in more words than in other languages.