Tag Archives: German

Consonant gradation for verbs

Today’s (8th October 2018) meeting was all about grammar.

Unfortunately, everyone had quite a busy schedule, so we decided to meet between our lectures at TAMK.

We focused mainly on the conjugation of verbs and therefore on the consonant gradation of Finnish verbs. When conjugating verbs, you also need to think of consonant gradation. Each verb type has its own rules. Of course, we also covered some German verbs which we found useful to know. It was interesting to see that the entire group seem to have at least a little fun while doing grammar (it’s obviously necessary to know some basic grammar, but it can also be enjoyable) – especially if you found some rules and repetition in different words/verbs.

I already know quite a lot verbs, especially the basics:  kirjoittaa, nukua, lukea, puhua, tehdä, käyttää, myydä, ostaa, oddotta, olla, opiskella, syödä, juosta, juoda, mennä, tulla, istua, asua, kysyä, katsoa, sanoa

Writing them down here makes me extra aware of how many verbs I already know by heart! That’s amazing! The easiest way for me to learn them is to remember to which verb-type they belong.

For example, the most common is Type 1, which ends with a vocal + ä/a (asua, istua, sanoa, kysyä …) this type is probably the easiest to conjugate since you only cut of the ä/a and add the ending of the person

asua → asu

asun / asut / hän asuu / me asumme / te asutte / he asuvat

It’s easy like that! I which everything of the Finnish grammar would stick in my head like that, but it’s still a long way to go. Anyway, even baby-steps will get me to a good level of Finnish in the future! 🙂

Alku aina hankala. ♥ Aller Anfang ist schwer.

My second „Each One Teach One” meeting, this time with the entire group, took place at “Pella’s Café”. Now that it’s getting slightly colder after a great summer we decided to meet in a cosier place than we did the last time.

We continued our learning with Vocabulary/Phrases lists about clothes, weather, body and transport. For this matter, Antero prepared a list with words he thought would be important. Melanie and I helped our German learners with the right German translations. It was interesting to see that some words sounded or looked similar in either English-German [jacket – Jacke] or German-Finnish [Hose – housut]. Some words lead to beaming smiles on the Finnish faces just like “Handschuh” [gloves]. Yes, we Germans put ‘shoes’ for our hands on, when it’s getting cold outside! 😉

Besides learning new words, it was interesting to me that Finns talk differently about the weather. The German language has specific words for specific actions related to weather while the Finnish language uses terms like “it’s raining snow”[sataa lunta] for “it’s snowing”.

Mielenkiintoinen !!

While exchanging our languages I enjoyed the relaxed atmosphere we shared in the group which also lead to some interest from locals. Some seemed to be quite interested when the Finns started to say German words and vice versa.

Furthermore, we decided to meet every Monday from now on since this day suits us the most. Apart from the Monday, we try to find a second date per week. For next Monday everyone will come up with a few verbs he/she would like to learn. Our next meeting will be a “Finnish lesson” since we focused this time more on German. 😊

Näkemiin!!

 

Frühstück

At first I must say that I’m very interested in German language but still it has been a huge step for me (a really shy guy) to get in to a thing like this. There was a big iceberg in front of me before I decided to sign up for this course. But I did, and I’m never going to regret that decision! I have been studying German for 7 years, but it has been a long time ago (in the last millennium). So I know the basics, but I have forgotten German words quite a lot.

At the first meeting we talked a lot in English and we did take short German lessons every now and then, it was actually quite fun! We also talked about ourselves so we get to know each other. We were in a lunch bar and we ate some breakfast (das Frühstück). I did learn some German words and some grammar rules, and they started to come back in to my mind. I can feel my German skills going up, but on the other hand I noticed my English skills are not so high what I thought. ;D

I think the best way for me to learn German is to just conversate in German as much as possible. They say that you can’t put any information to anyone’s head by using force, but you must grab the information willingly and pull it in to the head yourself. This kind of meetings works for me, when I’m actually “asking” for teaching and therefore it’s me who is responsible for receiving it.

So the ice has started to melt, and I’m very excited about future meetings! The other group members are so nice and positive about this too! Ich möchte viel Deutsch lernen!

 

2nd meeting

Now there is only three students in our group. Our second meeting was also at Tamk with Julia (German) and Monji (Japan). We talked about the articles kein and keinen and also about modal verbs. We translated sentences from German to English , German to Finnish and Finnish to German. I talked with Julia in Finnish and she is very good already, with minor mistakes.

My vocabulary of the day:

Mögen = to like/may

Dürfen = be allowed to/may

Können = be able to/can

Müssen = to have to/must

Sollen = to ought to/should

Wollen = to want to

Alisa Lätti

Meeting 1: Talking about the time

Our first real meeting was in the Cafeteria of TAMK, but unfortunately only three of us had time on that day.

In the beginning we practiced talking about the time, which is a really important subject in Germany. I can confirm the stereotype that Germans are always on time and that being late is considered unpolite. Of course, not every German is like this, but in general it is true. Me for example, I am always at least ten minutes too early and get very annoyed if I am running late.

When we were practicing I was also able to revise the Finnish expressions, which was a good exercise for me because I didn’t talk about the time in Finnish for a longer while.

Practicing the time in German online: http://www.lehrerlenz.de/die_uhrzeit2.html
Practising the time in Finnish online: http://venla.info/exercise-time.php

 

Julia’s vocabulary:

The time

     
The time Die Uhrzeit Kellonaika
What is the time? Wie spät ist es?

Wie viel Uhr ist es?

Mitä kello on?

Kuinka paljon kello on?

It is… (one) o’clock. Es ist… (ein) Uhr. Kello on… (yksi).
It is half past…(twelve). Es ist halb… (eins). Kello on puoli… (yksi).
It is quarter to… (one). Es ist viertel vor… (eins). Kello on varttia vaille… (yksi).
It is quarter past… (one). Es ist viertel nach… (eins). Kello on varttia yli… (yksi).
It is five minutes to… (one). Es ist fünf Minuten vor… (eins). Kello on viisi minuuttia vaille… (yksi).
It is five minutes past… (one). Es ist fünf Minuten nach… (eins). Kello on viisi minuuttia yli… (yksi).
At what time? Um wie viel Uhr? Moneltako?
At… (one) o’clock.

At… (one).

Um… (ein) Uhr.

Um… (eins).

Kello… (yksi).

Yhdeltä.

At half past… (twelve). Um halb… (eins). Puoli yhdeltä.

 

 

Getting to know each other

Hello Everyone! First of all, I would like to give you a short introduction about myself.

My name is Julia and I’m a 20 years old girl from South Germany. I am currently a first-year student of International Business and I am living for about one year and a half in Finland. Before I started to study, I was working as au pair in a Finnish family from where I already got the basics of the Finnish language.

The “Each One Teach One” course is a great opportunity to practice my Finnish skills, especially the speaking in which I am not confident yet.

When our German-Finnish group met for the first time, it was Liebe auf den ersten Blick – love at first sight. But at the same time, we were also facing a problem: With five people our group is the biggest group of the course and in addition I am the only German in there.

Despite everything we believed that we would figure out how to arrange our future meetings so that everyone would be able to meet with me at least ten times.

So, during our first (unofficial) meeting we were presenting ourselves, talking about our language levels and what we wish to achieve during the course. We also tried to come up with ideas where we could meet and what we could do together.

The people in our group are very kind and funny and I am looking forward to our meetings!

 

Julia’s vocabulary:

Getting to know each other

     
Hello/Hi Hallo/Hi Moi/Hei
How are you? Wie geht es dir? Mitä kuuluu?
I’m fine. Mir geht es gut. Hyvää kuuluu.
What is your name? Wie heißt du? Mikä sinun nimi on?
My name is… Ich heiße… Minun nimi on…
Nice to meet you! Schön dich kennenzulernen! Hauska tutustua!
Where are you from? Woher kommst du? Mistä sinä olet kotoisin?
I am from… (Germany) Ich komme aus… (Deutschland) Olen kotoisin … (Saksasta)
Where do you live? Wo wohnst du? Missä sinä asut?
I live in… (Finland) Ich wohne in… (Finnland) Asun… (suomessa)
Which languages do you speak? Welche Sprachen sprichst du? Mitä kieliä sinä puhut?
I speak… (English) Ich spreche… (Englisch) Puhun… (englantia)
I don’t speak… (Swedish) Ich spreche kein… (Schwedisch) En puhu… (ruotsia)

10th meeting: Course is getting to its end

11.12.2017

For the tenth meeting either of us actually wanted to do anything too hard or exhausting so we decided to do a recap of the course. We went through what we have learned and done. We also talked about the autumn semester. For both of us it has been quite hectic and it was hard to get our schedules to meet time to time. We both had our uni and homework and our personal lives. I also had a lot of practices in the evening when Daniel would have had time and then when i didn’t have any lectures he would have school from 8 to 16. Considering all of that I think we could work around it quite nicely.

I had a good chance to maintain my German skills and to get over my fear of speaking German. I hope I have been able to help Daniel to learn the Finnish language, culture and way of living 🙂

We love food, sorry. “Bavarian evening at @TAMK

This time Jacqueline invited us to an event she was hosting with some other German girls at the Catering Studio. This time the girls didn’t prepared the dishes but another student from TAMK did. They had a menu on the wall and although I wanted to tried the “Schnitzel” I went with the salad “Kartoffelsalat” once more. We spend the evening talking about our plans for Christmas and when did we planned to go back to our countries.

Futhermore, we meet with some Maria and Jacqueline friends that we met on Oktoberfest and we learn how to play a German game called “Kniffel”. the point of the game was to collect the same numbers or a set of combination similar to the ones in Poker.

You could only roll the dice 3 times and you can keep the ones you thing are good enough to score a good combination.

  We also had the opportunity to see Jacky with her “Dirndl” on, this attire is mostly use in celebrations in Germany  or big gatherings like Oktoberfest.

Billiard at Mallashovi.

This evening was a bit out of the blue but, we manage to reunite at Mallashovi. One of the most famous bars among students and sport fans. We came up with a way of practicing the numbers and colours in Spanish and German. While we played we asked to the other team what was the colour or the number in German or Spanish. and so we had a fun evening and we learn and practice the vocabulary.

Spanish English German
azul blue blau
blanco white weiß
marrón brown braun
naranja orange orange
amarillo yellow gelb
rojo red rot
verde green grün
negro black schwarz

I already knew before hand the numbers from 1 to 10 but on this evening I practice some new numbers:

 

Spanish German
once 11 elf
doce 12 swölf
trece 13 dreizehn
catorce 14 vierzehn
quince 15 fünfzehn
diez  y seis 16 sechzehn
diez y siete 17 siebzehn
diez y ocho 18 achtzehn
diez y nueve 19 neunzehn
veinte 20 swanzig

 

Farewell- Independence Day Reception

Yesterday afternoon our EOTO group attended the Independence Day Reception at Tampere City Hall. The programme consisted in a choir, a speech, a theatre work and a light buffet dinner. I was impressed by how big and elegant the city hall was.

The buffet dinner consisted in typical Finnish food (Karelian pie, reindeer pastry, 100 vuotta vanha cake), and wine.

Here is some vocabulary that we learnt during the evening:

English- Spanish- Chineese- German

  • Birthday- Cumpleaños- 生日 (shengri)-  Geburtstag
  • Cake- Tarta- 蛋糕 (dangao)- Kuchen
  • Wine- Vino- 葡萄酒 (putaojiu)- Wein
  • Reindeer- Reno- 驯鹿 (xunlu)- Rentiere
  • Farewell- Despedida- 告别 (gaobie)-  Abschied
  • Present- Regalo- 礼物 (liwu)- Geschenk
  • City hall – Ayuntamiento- 市政厅 (sizen ting)- Rathaus
  • Theater- Teatro- 剧院 (juyuan)- Theater
  • Banquet hall- Sala de banquetes- 宴会厅 (yanhui ting)- Festsaal
  • Independence – Independencia- 独立(duli)- Unabhängigkeit
  • Party – Fiesta- 派对 (paidui)- Feier
  • Elegant – Elegante- 再见(zaijian)- Elegant

After having dinner, we took several pictures at different places of the city hall and also at the photocall they had installed for TAMK, UTA and TUT students.

Once the party was over, it was time to say goodbye, and Loy gave each of us a Malaysian keychain as a farewell gift.

I really liked the Each One Teach one course, because in addition to meeting great people from different countries, and knowing more about their culture and their language, in each meeting we did many different funny activities, although the worst part is that I’m going to miss a lot all of the members of my group. It was a pleasure to meet all of you! Who knows, maybe we will see each other in the future in each other’s country!