Tag Archives: German

10th meeting: Course is getting to its end

11.12.2017

For the tenth meeting either of us actually wanted to do anything too hard or exhausting so we decided to do a recap of the course. We went through what we have learned and done. We also talked about the autumn semester. For both of us it has been quite hectic and it was hard to get our schedules to meet time to time. We both had our uni and homework and our personal lives. I also had a lot of practices in the evening when Daniel would have had time and then when i didn’t have any lectures he would have school from 8 to 16. Considering all of that I think we could work around it quite nicely.

I had a good chance to maintain my German skills and to get over my fear of speaking German. I hope I have been able to help Daniel to learn the Finnish language, culture and way of living 🙂

We love food, sorry. “Bavarian evening at @TAMK

This time Jacqueline invited us to an event she was hosting with some other German girls at the Catering Studio. This time the girls didn’t prepared the dishes but another student from TAMK did. They had a menu on the wall and although I wanted to tried the “Schnitzel” I went with the salad “Kartoffelsalat” once more. We spend the evening talking about our plans for Christmas and when did we planned to go back to our countries.

Futhermore, we meet with some Maria and Jacqueline friends that we met on Oktoberfest and we learn how to play a German game called “Kniffel”. the point of the game was to collect the same numbers or a set of combination similar to the ones in Poker.

You could only roll the dice 3 times and you can keep the ones you thing are good enough to score a good combination.

  We also had the opportunity to see Jacky with her “Dirndl” on, this attire is mostly use in celebrations in Germany  or big gatherings like Oktoberfest.

Billiard at Mallashovi.

This evening was a bit out of the blue but, we manage to reunite at Mallashovi. One of the most famous bars among students and sport fans. We came up with a way of practicing the numbers and colours in Spanish and German. While we played we asked to the other team what was the colour or the number in German or Spanish. and so we had a fun evening and we learn and practice the vocabulary.

Spanish English German
azul blue blau
blanco white weiß
marrón brown braun
naranja orange orange
amarillo yellow gelb
rojo red rot
verde green grün
negro black schwarz

I already knew before hand the numbers from 1 to 10 but on this evening I practice some new numbers:

 

Spanish German
once 11 elf
doce 12 swölf
trece 13 dreizehn
catorce 14 vierzehn
quince 15 fünfzehn
diez  y seis 16 sechzehn
diez y siete 17 siebzehn
diez y ocho 18 achtzehn
diez y nueve 19 neunzehn
veinte 20 swanzig

 

Farewell- Independence Day Reception

Yesterday afternoon our EOTO group attended the Independence Day Reception at Tampere City Hall. The programme consisted in a choir, a speech, a theatre work and a light buffet dinner. I was impressed by how big and elegant the city hall was.

The buffet dinner consisted in typical Finnish food (Karelian pie, reindeer pastry, 100 vuotta vanha cake), and wine.

Here is some vocabulary that we learnt during the evening:

English- Spanish- Chineese- German

  • Birthday- Cumpleaños- 生日 (shengri)-  Geburtstag
  • Cake- Tarta- 蛋糕 (dangao)- Kuchen
  • Wine- Vino- 葡萄酒 (putaojiu)- Wein
  • Reindeer- Reno- 驯鹿 (xunlu)- Rentiere
  • Farewell- Despedida- 告别 (gaobie)-  Abschied
  • Present- Regalo- 礼物 (liwu)- Geschenk
  • City hall – Ayuntamiento- 市政厅 (sizen ting)- Rathaus
  • Theater- Teatro- 剧院 (juyuan)- Theater
  • Banquet hall- Sala de banquetes- 宴会厅 (yanhui ting)- Festsaal
  • Independence – Independencia- 独立(duli)- Unabhängigkeit
  • Party – Fiesta- 派对 (paidui)- Feier
  • Elegant – Elegante- 再见(zaijian)- Elegant

After having dinner, we took several pictures at different places of the city hall and also at the photocall they had installed for TAMK, UTA and TUT students.

Once the party was over, it was time to say goodbye, and Loy gave each of us a Malaysian keychain as a farewell gift.

I really liked the Each One Teach one course, because in addition to meeting great people from different countries, and knowing more about their culture and their language, in each meeting we did many different funny activities, although the worst part is that I’m going to miss a lot all of the members of my group. It was a pleasure to meet all of you! Who knows, maybe we will see each other in the future in each other’s country!

Hockey Match

Last Tuesday we went to watch an ice-hockey match at the Tampere ice stadium (Tappara against Ässät). For me, it was the first time that I saw an ice-hockey game, and I really liked the experience.
While we watched the game I explained them that in Spain we don’t have teams of cheerleaders like in Finland and in other countries, at least in small cities, and the sport that is most practiced is football, since Spain has various of the most famous football teams in the world, like Real Madrid and Barça. In Germany one of the sports that is most practiced is tennis, although football is also one of the favorites sports, and in Malaysia football is also the preferred sport. We also learnt some vocabulary related to ice- hockey in German, Chineese and Spanish.

English- German- Chineese- Spanish

(ice)Hockey – Eishockey-  曲棍球 (qugunqiu) – Hockey (sobre hielo)
Hockey stick – Eishockeyschläger- 曲棍球棍 (qugunqiugun) – Palo de hockey/stick
Game – Spiel- 游戏 (youxi)- Juego/partido
Tricot – Tricot- 经编 (jing bian)- Camisola
Team – Mannschaft- 队伍 (duiwu)- Equipo
Referee – Schiedsrichter- 裁判 (caipan)- Árbitro
Ice-skates – Schlittschuhe- 溜冰 (liubing)- Patines de hielo
Goal – Tor- 入球 (ru qiu)-  Gol
To play – spielen- 玩 (wan)- Jugar
Whistle – Pfeife- 哨子 (shaozi)- Silbar
Cheerleader- Cheerleader- 啦啦队 (laladiu)- Animadora

The final score was Tappara 3-4 Ässät. After watching the game we spent some time with people from another EOTO group who had also gone to watch the game; we took some pictures all together and went with them to the nearest bus stop to go home, since it was snowing and none had an umbrella…  We haven’t got used to the beginning of winter yet!

EOTO Christmas Party

Last Monday, the EOTO Christmas Party was celebrated in TAMK, so we decided to buy some food and beberages and go to celebrate it. There were people from many different groups and countries. There was a typical Finnish mulled wine with spices called “glögi” and cider to drink, and cookies and chips to eat.

While we were eating, we talked about the different Christmas traditions of each country, as well as the typical Christmas dinner menus. I told them that in Spain lamb is one of the typical meals that we eat at Christmas, something that is also done in Germany, but not in Malaysia. Loy explained us that in Malaysia there isn’t a Christmas tradition as we know it in Europe; there are no gifts or dinner with the family, but people gather with their friends and go to do some activities together, usually a barbecue.

In addition to that, I explained them that although in Spain we also celebrate Christmas and have dinner together with our families, we also celebrate another party on January 6th, called “Reyes Magos”, and then is when we give all the presents to each other. The celebrations officially begin the evening before the Epiphany, on the night of the 5th of January, when the “Reyes Magos ride” (Cabalgata de los reyes magos, in Spanish) is celebrated in each city and town, and hundreds of people go out to the main streets of the urban centers to contemplate the recreation of the arrival of the wise men in the city.

After eating, we all played together with people from another groups to a card game called “Cards against humanity”. It was a very funny evening. Here are some of the words we learned during the afternoon:

ENGLISH- GERMAN- CHINEESE- SPANISH 

  • Cookies – Kekse- 饼干 (binggan) – Galletas
  • Christmas – Weihnachten – 圣诞 (shengdan) – Navidades
  • Snow – Schnee- 雪 (xue) – Nieve
  • Santa claus – Weihnachtsmann- 圣诞老人 (shengdanlaoren) – Papá Noel
  • Lamb – Lamm – 羊肉 (yangrou) – Cordero
  • Present – Geschenk-礼物 (liwu) – Regalo
  • Song –Lied- 歌 (ge) – Canción

Bavarian dinner at TAMK

Last Thursday, our EOTO group met at TAMK catering studio because there was a Bavarian Party.

Two members of our group, Tomi and Ivan, live in Bavaria, Germany, so it was a good opportunity to learn more about the culture of that region.

When I arrived, there were only German speakers in the room. They were from 3 different countries: Austria, Germany and Switzerland (one of them, Kasimir, another member of the group).

The room was decorated with ornaments with the flag of Bavaria. In the walls, there were posters of the food and drinkings menu.

While we waited for the food and the drinks, I talked with Kasimir about the typical costume of the place where he lives in Switzerland, and he showed me pictures of both man and woman costumes. In most of the pictures people had cows behind them. Kasimir explained me it was because people dress with them in the villages when the summer begins and the cows are lowered from the mountains to the villages and a party is celebrated.

He also told me about Heidi, a children’s anime and book of a child called Heidi, that lives in the Swiss Alps near the border with Austria. It was written by the Swiss writer Johanna Spyri. I told him that I knew her, because she is also famous in Spain, and I’ve read the book when I was a child.

After that, the food arrived. The main plate was an Austrian typical dish, called “Schnitzel with potato salad” (a very thin, breaded and pan fried cutlet made from veal, accompained with a potato salad). In Spain, we call that filet “escalope”.

We had beers to drink, and roasted almonds as an appetizer.

FOOD MENU (German- Spanish- English)

  • Schnitzel mit Kartoffelsalat – Escalope con ensalada de patatas – Schnitzel with potato salad
  • Wurstsalat mit Brezel- Ensalada de salchichas con pretzel – Sausage salad with pretzel
  • Butterbrezel- Pretzel con mantequilla – Buttered pretzel
  • Geröstete Mandeln- Almendras tostadas -Roasted almonds

DRINKINGS MENU (German- Spanish- English)

  • Apfelsaft “Shorle” – Zumo de manzana “Schorle” – Apple juice “Schorle”
  • Spezi, Cola, Orangensoda – Spezi, Cola, soda de naranja – Spezi, coke, orange soda
  • Radlebier – Cerveza Radler – Radle beer.

It was a funny and interesting meeting!

Learning at the supermarket/szupermarket/Supermarkt :)

Sziastok! Hogy vagy? 😊

Our FIFTH meeting took place in the SOKOS supermarket. We walked through the supermarket and searched for food items, Flóra prepared for this meeting. I tried to speak every word and Flóra corrected my mistakes in pronunciation. Some words are quite easy to pronounce and remember and some are difficult to remember, because I cannot derive the words from languages I already learned.

Since Flóra do not speak Finnish as well, we decided always to check the Finnish labels in the supermarket to learn the Finnish word for these food items too. While strolling through the supermarket, we talked about the supermarket systems in our countries and compared these with the Finnish one. To give an example, in Germany and Hungary you can buy every kind of alcohol in the supermarket. We do not have any special alcohol store like Alko. But the difference between German and Hungarian stores in selling alcohol is that hard alcohol in Germany is usually locked in glass shelves. You have to ask an employee to unlock and hand over the bottle.

Next time we are going to do some shopping and Flóra can practice speaking in various places. And perhaps we will find some presents for Christmas 😊

6. Meeting: Recepti, vadelma-toffeepuustit ja Apfelkuchen mit Streuseln

Hmmmm…. while writing this, my stomach is newly filled with the delicious vadelma-toffeepuustit, that Pauliina and I baked yesterday.

We met at her place. This time, we wanted to learn more about food – vocabulary, making an order in a restaurant or café and beeing able to ask for prices or ingredients. But how can you talk about food and not cook or bake something in the meantime?

Both of us prepared a recipe for a typical pastry. Pauliina had a receipe for finnish Lingonberry-toffee-rolls (we changed the lingonberries to rasberries, that Pauliina picked at the mökki in summertime) and I had a recipe for a german Apfelkuchen mit Streuseln (apple pie with crumbles).

We translated all ingredients and figured out, that you just need to put an -a in the end of an ingredient, when you take an amount of it.
So yeast = hiiva. 50g of yeast = 50g hiivaa (okay, just a little recipe-“fun-fact”).

Pauliina made some very nice Apfelkuchen with a lot of love. First the dough, then placing the apple sclices on it and then making some nice Streusel to put on the apples.


Baking the finnish rolls took more time. We first prepared the dough, and since it included hiiva, we needed to let it grow for 30 min. Afterwards, we spread it out, put butter, brown sugar, toffees and rasberries on top (voi, fariinisokeri, kermatoffee-karammelli: Fazers Omar, vedelmat). Then we rolled the dough, cut them into trangles and again needed to let them grow for another 30 min. Then we pressed them down on the tray. It was very funny to read the finnish recipe, since they very detailed explanations of every single step.

  • Cut two 30 x 50 cm squares.
  • Cut the rolls into little triangles.
  • Put the slices rolls with the thin corner on top and press it down a little.

But we did, and the result was fabulous!

 

Of course, we had some coffee with it. And of course, we all drank it out of a moomin cup. 

Knowing some words for different ingredients and groceries, I told Pauliina that I sometimes have trouble in the supermarket, when I need to weight the vegetables and don’t know which number belongs to which vegetable, because I don’t know the finnish words for them.

So we learned some of the important ones.
Kasviksia – vegetables
Hedelmät – fruits
Porkkana – carrots
Peruna – potatoes
Sipuli – onion
Munakoiso – eggplant
(easy to remember, because muna = egg!)
kesäkurpitsa – Zucchini
(very funny to remember, because kesä = summer and kurpitsa = pumpkin, yay!)
tomatti – tomato
(thank you dear Finland, for having one easy word)
Omena – apple
banani – banana
kurkku – cucumber
Sämpylä – bun
Leipä – bread
kala – fish
liha – meat
keitto – soup
makka – sausage
viini – wine
olut – beer
maitoa – milk
… and a lot more.

And in order to be able to order something or ask for something, we translated some Survival-sentences:
Mulla on nälkä – I am hungry.
Mulla on jano – I am thirsty.
Hyvää ruokahalua – Enjoy your meal.
Saisinko….? – Can I have …?
Haluaisin … – I would like to have …
Ottaisin … – I would like to take …
(Did you notice? The form “isi” in the word is to make it polite! Nice to know!)
Voinko maksaa korttilla? – Do you take card?
Hauluaisitko …? – Do you want… ?
Missä … on? – Where is … ?
Mistä löydän … ? – Where can I find …?

Minkä hintainen … on? – How much is it?

I don’t know if this is just too stereotypically finnish – but Finns don’t have a word for “please”. It just doesn’t exist! So if you order something, you would just say “Kiitos” afterwads, but not “please”. I remember, when my mom told me always to say “please” after a question, when I was little. I wondered – what do finnish moms teach their kids then?

So I hope, my daily life gets a little bit easier now. Or at least, I am able to practise some spoken finnish in the supermarket!

Last but not least:
One fun fact that I needed to laugh about:
Toi voi = That butter.
Hän toivoi = he whished.
Ehm… yes.

 

Túrógombóc – so delicious! :)

Our THIRD MEETING was great. We cooked a typical Hungarian dish together at Flóras place – Túrógombóc 😊 Túró in Englisch means quark cheese and gombóc dumpling, so Túrógombóc is a sweet dumpling made with quark cheese. In Hungary Túrógombóc is usually served with sour cream, breadcrumbs and icing sugar. I really enjoyed it – it was delicious! 😊

Since the prepared dough must rest for one hour in the fridge, we took advantage of this break to improve my Hungarian skills. Flóra teached me the Hungarian numbers 0 to 30. She told me the numbers and I wrote them down. My immediate reaction was – oh no, not that difficult letter again! I must confess that I have some reluctance in saying the letter GY (the pronunciation is so difficult – hopefully for all German people and not only for me 😊). Apart from the difficult pronunciation, counting in Hungarian is not that difficult. For example, 35 can be formed by using 30 (harminc) + 5 (öt) while connecting them: 35 = harmincöt. The numbers from 11 to19 and 21 to 29 are trickier, because you must add en or rather on between them.

It was a great meeting with a lot of fun and good talks about this and that 😊 For the next meeting, we will meet at my place and cook some typical German (or rather Swabian) filled “raviolis” called Maultaschen.