Tag Archives: second meeting

Tour around the Metso library and studying

Yesterday we met the second time with GaYeon and JunHyeok. We met at the Metso library and I gave them a quick tour around the library, starting form the bottom floor and going up to the third floor. The library is more or less familiar for me (I usually go to the music section) but I think the explaining of what is where went just fine.

We found some books in Korean, and books about Korea.  I think both JunHyeok and Gayeon were a bit surprised that there were books about North Korea as well. In the language section, where you go if you want to learn languages, were some books about learning Korean, but they were only in English.

After the tour we went to the Metso cafeteria on the third floor to study. There I noticed, that the material that I had prepared, I had only printed out for GaYeon and JunHyeok. It would have been easier to teach if I would have printed the material for myself also. But maybe I’ll remember to do so next time!

This time we started with Korean, because last time we started with Finnish. The first picture shows a list of Korean letters, and words starting with those letters. In my opinion the list is great for me to practice different sounds. For some reason the Korean vowels are easier for me to learn than reading the consonants, but practice makes perfect. 🙂

When we went through the list I also taught the Finnish equivalent for every word, and some of the words on the list were also on the material that I had prepared for our meeting. It was a bit tough for me to think the “perfect” Finnish translation, so I used Google Translate app on my phone to help me. On the material I gave them there were a list of food related words and a small discussion.

GaYeon also goes to Finnish lessons, so she had learned some of the words already, but for JunHyeok there seemed to be quite a lot of new words to go through.  I hope I didn’t go too fast when I taught.

Overall I think we are getting comfortable with each other, which is really nice to notice, and I look forward to see them next Friday.

 

Ach du grüne Neune! :)

For our SECOND MEETING, we decided to meet at TAMK, because I already had courses in the morning. We had lunch at the cafeteria and talked about our week and the Stockholm trip. Both of us went to the trip to Stockholm organized by CLINT and we met at the ferry. It was fun spending the first evening together with our friends.

I am going to help Flóra out with deepen her German skills in speaking. She already can speak German very well. At our last meeting, we talked a lot about us, our life in Germany/Hungary and our family. I told her, that I am already in the master’s degree and I am looking forward earning my own money, because my parents paid the largest part of my expenses during my study. While talking to her I used a typical German phrase “jemandem auf der Tasche liegen” which means to live on the expanse of somebody. Flóra told me that she understood what I wanted to say but she never heard it before. So, I prepared some typical phrases we usually use in Germany for our second meeting and explained them to her.

To cite a few examples, Germans use the phrase “den Faden verlieren” to tell somebody that they lose sight of what they are trying to do, e.g. a blackout in a presentation. I think in English you can say “lose the thread”. Or another example is “Ach du grüne Neune!“ which is an exclamation of surprise or astonishment. In English you say “Good grief!“ or „Gorblimey!“.

After I explained Flóra the German phrases we revised the vocabulary I learned last time.

At our next meeting we are going to cook some typical Hungarian food together. We haven’t decided yet which one, but I am really looking forward to it 🙂

Dutch and Italian basis: letters and numbers

The second time me and Sanne met in the campus. We found a very small room in building H for only two-three people, so we were fery focused!

This time we learnt some grammar rules, starting from the Dutch alphabet… It’s crazy! at the beginning it was quite easy, not too different from the German ones but then the problems begin: they have a lot of diphthongs (couple of vowels in which the tongue moves from one position to another) and sometimes two vowels must sound completely different from their original sound when they are alone.

In particular the couples ij and ei have the same sound but the second is longer, ee sounds /ei/, ui is /au/ and eu /öu/ .

I still have to practise a lot before to be able to manage those weird sounds and changings!

the following step was to learn numbers from 1 to 20 (oops! Sanne told me that they almost use the letteral form to express numbers so: from een to twintig). They are not too difficult, quite similar to German, and I had some problems only with the number five (vijf sounds /veif/) and nine (negen, ’cause I still have problem with the sound of the letter “g”).

We skipped to Italian, which alphabet is probably easier (and shorter: letters j, k, w, x, y are not formally part of our alphabet and they appear only in some foreigner words, like koala, wurtsel, yoghurt). Sanne was really good in spelling and she was always able to spell correctly any words. I have a really good student!

On the contrary to count in Italian is quite harder. While numbers from 1 to 10 (we use arabic numerals more the letteral forms) are somehow similar to Spanish and French, numbers from 11 to 20 and over are full of irregular forms and many consonant shifts. For example 4 is quattro, but 14 is quattordici; 7 is sette” and 17 is diciassette. Poor Sanne! I never realized how difficult can be counting in Italian!

This lesson was quite hard but very useful!

Carlo Soregotti