Tag Archives: spanish

Second meeting – weather words

We met again at cafe Pala for a weather-related meeting. Some of this stuff I have already learned before but forgotten, but I learned some completely new things as well.

Weather in Spanish is “tiempo”, which also means time. Some words I remembered from my past studies were “sol” (sun) and “nevar” (to snow). Words that I had to revise were “lluvia” (rain), “nieve” (snow), and “viento”(wind). I also somewhat remembered how to actually use the words in a sentence. You use the verb “estar” (be) for weather that can be thought as an event like rain and snow. So, “está lloviendo” means it is raining. For other words like sun and wind, you use the verb “hacer”(to do/make). So “hace viento” means it is windy.

It’s sunny = hace sol

It’s snowing = está nevando

It’s hot = hace calor

It’s cold = hace frío

Some completely new words that I learned were “tormenta” (storm) and “granito” (hail). Another new word that is very specific to Spanish weather is “bochorno”, which is very humid and hot weather. I think it can be compared to the Finnish word “helle”, though Finland hardly has as extreme heat or humidity as Spain.

We also ended up talking about the “have to” structure in both our languages. I remembered that in Spanish you use the verb “tener”(have) paired with “que”, but I had never learned that you actually have to use a reflexive pronoun within the structure, so that was an useful bit of information. I also learned to say “hace un frío que pela”, which is basically saying it is very cold. It means something like “a cold that peels”, which surely doesn’t sound pleasant, but then again cold for Spaniards is at like 0 °C (sorry Ignasi).

Tenth Meeting – Christmas Party!

We met at Janica’s home to celebrate a Christmas Party!

In the begining she showed us a Photo Album of her Exchange to Argentina. It was very fun to see all the pictures and to listen to the stories she told us! She was staying in Buenos Aires, but also had some time to travel to Uruguay and Brasil- It was very funny because when I saw the picture of her in the beach in Montevideo it happens that I live 2 blocks away from the place the picture was taken!

From her visit to Argentina Janica has a mate, so she had it ready when we arrived. Getuar had never tried mate so I was very excited to see if he would like it or not. The mate had some sugar in it, so it was not the original one (it is very bitter) but it was ok for him.

We spent the evening listening to Christmas songs and telling each other how do we spend Christmas time. We had some Finnish Christmas food: joulutorttu, glögi, ginger breads and chocolate. It was a lovely evening and I didn’t wanted to end!

It was very nice to meet Janica and Getuar so I will be forever thankful to this course of giving me the chance to meet them! I hope we can meet again in the future!

At the end of the meeting Janica was so nice to gave us a ride back home 🙂

Eight Meeting – Family and Relatives

We met at TAMK library again for this meeting. The topic for today is family members and other relationships. I already know most of them in Finnish but  I also learned some new ones.

I really enjoy the process of teaching Spanish, even more than learning Finnish. Sometimes I get very passionate about some topics and start explaining some curious words and grammar issues. I know that they are quite advance topics, but I am not pretending Janica and Getuar to learn them know, but just to make them awake that Spanish can be sometimes very tricky! For example baby in Spanish is “bebé”, but if you write “bebe” it means drink.

We have a lot of fun telling all the family members, Janica remembers a lot of them even when she stayed for a short time in Argentina! She says she is not good with languages but I don’t think so, I think she has a great capacity of learning and remembering!

These are some of the words we learned:
Finnish, Spanish, English:

Äiti, madre/mamá, mother.
Isä, padre/papá father.
Veli, hermano, brother.
Sisko, hermana, sister.
Isoäiti, abuela, grandmother.
Isoisä, abuelo, grandfather.
Täti, tía, aunt.
Setä, tío, uncle.
Vanhemmat, padres, parents.
Serkku, primos, cousins.
Tyttö, chica, girl.
Poika, chico, boy.
Ystävä, amigo/amiga, friend.
Tyttöystävä, novia, girlfriend.
Piokaystävä, novio, boyfriend.
Vauva, bebé, baby.

This was a really nice meeting, for the next ones we are planning to have a Christmas party at Janicas’s place and going to Vapriikki Museum.

Seventh Meeting – Help! I have a Finnish test!

We met at TAMK library this time. I have Finnish test and I need to study so Janica and Getuar will help me 🙂

We talked about colours and adjetives. Most of the words were not new for me but I needed to learn it by heart

This meeting was pretty fun, because we sat in a computer to write all the words and we “played a game”. The game was that Getuar wrote a color in English and I had to say it in Finnish and Janica had to say it in Spanish, so it was kind of a Memory Game. I didn’t remember most of them but Janica has a very good memory and said almost all the colours by heart! It was a very fun way to review our knowledge!

We did a similar thing with the adjectives to describe things. Here are some of the adjectives we talked about:
Finnish, Spanish, English:

Uusi, nuevo, new.
Vanha, viejo, old.
Nuori, joven, Young.
Iso, grande, big.
Pieni, chico/pequeño, small.
Pitkä, alto, tall.
Lyhyt, corto/pequeño, short.
Kallis, caro, expensive.
Halpa, barato, cheap.
Kuuma, caliente, hot.
Kylmä, frío, cold.
Kaunis, linda/hermosa/bonita, beautiful.
Komea, lindo/hermoso/bonito, handsome.
Onnellinen, feliz, happy.
Surullinen, triste, sad.
Hyvä, bueno/bien, good.
Paha/Huono, malo, bad.

Thank you Janica and Getuar for yor help! We also had a very fun time!


Fifth Meeting – What time is it?

For this meeting we met at the Waffle Café again!

We learned about how to say the time. Telling the hour in Finnish is quite similar to English, but is Spanish it is slightly different. What we did was drawing some clocks with different cases and wrote the time in Finnish and Spanish. I think we need to practise a lot to learn it properly.

We learned the greetings we should say depending on the time of the day.

We also talked a bit about Lapland because I really want to go there this year. Getuar has never been there but Janica has worked there during Christmas season some time ago. So it was good that she could gave some tips 🙂

Fourth meeting – Days of the week

We met in the Waffle Café which is a lovely place with delicious food!

The topic for this meeting was the days of the week. I already know them in Finnish but Getuar was learning them in Spanish for the first time. I told them that the names of the days comes from the planets and sun and moon.
Lunes (Monday) comes from Luna (Moon). Martes (Tuesday) comes from Marte. Miércoles (Wednesday) comes from Mercurio (Mercury). Jueves (Thursday) comes from Júpiter. Viernes (Friday) comes from Venus. Sábado (Saturday) comes from the Hebrew Sabbath. Domingo (Sunday) comes from Sol (sun).

I think it is easy for me to remember the days of week in Finnish because I can relate most of them to the English, but I think to Getuar it might be more difficult to remember them in Spanish because you cannot relate the days to Finnish nor English.

In this meeting we also started talking about Christmas traditions. We wanted to know the differences and similarities on how we celebrate Christmas. The conversation was very interesting.

For example, in Uruguay families get together for dinner at Christmas Eve and at midnight we hug and congratulate each other and there are Fireworks, after that we open the presents. In Finland there are not Fireworks at Christmas, and for example in Janica’s family they open the presents in the afternoon of Christmas Eve.

We had to leave because the Café was closing, but the conversation was so interesting that we will continue talking about that. We also think it would be a good idea to have a Christmas party together!

Third meeting – Learning numbers

For this meeting we went to Hesburguer because I really wanted to try Finnish junk food ;P we also had some discount coupons so we decided to use them.

The topic of the meeting were the numbers. I already learned them in my Basics of Finnish course but I thought it was good to remember them, and also Getuar don’t know the numbers in Spanish. We learned to count from 1 to 100. Janica remembered pretty well how to say numbers in Spanish.

They also told me that when people talk in Finnish they might say a shorter version of the numbers so I will be very aware when I go to the supermarket to recognize the numbers.

The meeting was very fun as we were eating hamburguers and also telling some stories about our lives.


Second Meeting – Supermarket time!

For this meeting we met in the supermarket that is downstairs from Stockmann. I really wanted some help with the name of the foods.  So we started to wander in the supermarket naming the food in Finnish and Spanish.

I am not a good cooker and I don’t cook for myself in my country that’s why I don’t know much about food or different types of one kind of food. Knowing that, imagine what happens when I go to a supermarket where everything is in Finnish, I have no clue of what to do!

One thing that  I wanted to know is why there are a lot of types of eggs, in my country as far as I know (you shouldn’t trust me) there are 2 types of eggs, the white ones and the brown ones. But here you can see at least 5 different boxes with different colors and names, but the eggs are all white! Janica and Getuar started to translate the names to me and I discovered that the names depend on how the chicken lives, etc.

Another difficult thing for me was the milk. At first I thought that the light blue one was the one with no fat. But one day I translated it from Finnish and it said it was non fat milk, but when I translated from Swedish it said fat milk! The conclusion is that you shouldn’t trust the translator! Light blue means non fat milk, dark blue means with little fat, and the red means with more fat.

I also learned the name of some animals, fruits and vegetables.

As Janica lived in Argentina for 3 months she started to remember the names of the things we where talking about. Getuar is starting to learn Spanish from zero, so he learned a lot of new vocabulary, but what got stuck in his mind was “Arroz y brócoli” which means “Rice and broccoli”.

These are some of the words I learned:
Finnish, Spanish, English:

Liha, carne, meat.
Munia, huevos, egg.
Kevyt, liviano, light.
Porkkana, zanahoria, carrot.
Leipä, pan, bread.
Luomu, orgánico, organic.
Kanan, pollo, chicken.
Nauda, vaca, cow.
Kalkkuna, pavo, turkey.
Jauheliha, carne picada, minced meat.
Basilika, albahaca, basil.
Kinkku, jamón, ham.
Maito, leche, milk.
Juusto, queso, cheese.
Appelsiini, naranja, orange.
Omena, manzana, Apple.

This meeting was very useful for me as now I understand the products in the supermarket better!

One funny thing that happened in the end of the meeting (was not funny in that moment) is that I lost my cellphone in a bench inside the supermarket. I realised about the loss when we were already upstairs, so we came back, someone found it and we had to pick it up on the third floor. I was so thankful that nobody stole it, in my country probably I would have never seen it again!

First meeting – Coffee and introductions

Our first meet was held at Wayne’s Coffee, after some weeks of deliberation on when to meet. Initially we were a group of 5 people, but in the end just 3 of us remained: Janica, Getuar and me.

I arrived to the Coffee in the exact moment when Janica and Getuar was meeting each other in the line. I was a little bit nervous about the expectations they would have for learning Spanish. But I was relieved after meeting them. They are so nice!

The first thing we did was buying some coffee and sitting to introduce to each other, we have a very nice talk about who we are and what we do.

Janica is from Tampere and last semester she went to Argentina for a exchange, for me that was a relief because she is used to hear people speaking like me (for example uruguayan and argentinian people will pronounce the word ‘Yo’ as “Sho” instead of “Io”).

Getuar is from Espoo but he is studying at Tampere. Getuar is a triplet! so he has 2 sisters. He was born in Finland but his parents are from Albania. I really liked to hear about the story of his parents.

I told them that I am from Uruguay, from a city called Rivera which is located in the border with Brasil. In the other side of the border there is a Brazilian city called Santana do Livramento, and the only things that divide the two cities is a street and a park. You can cross freely from one country to the other whenever you want.

We started to learn basic vocabulary. We learned how to introduce ourselves, how to say hello/goodbye and some other useful phrases:







I really liked this meeting  because I was able to meet Janica and Getuar and also to learn some new vocabulary. I am looking forward for the next meeting.


Farewell- Independence Day Reception

Yesterday afternoon our EOTO group attended the Independence Day Reception at Tampere City Hall. The programme consisted in a choir, a speech, a theatre work and a light buffet dinner. I was impressed by how big and elegant the city hall was.

The buffet dinner consisted in typical Finnish food (Karelian pie, reindeer pastry, 100 vuotta vanha cake), and wine.

Here is some vocabulary that we learnt during the evening:

English- Spanish- Chineese- German

  • Birthday- Cumpleaños- 生日 (shengri)-  Geburtstag
  • Cake- Tarta- 蛋糕 (dangao)- Kuchen
  • Wine- Vino- 葡萄酒 (putaojiu)- Wein
  • Reindeer- Reno- 驯鹿 (xunlu)- Rentiere
  • Farewell- Despedida- 告别 (gaobie)-  Abschied
  • Present- Regalo- 礼物 (liwu)- Geschenk
  • City hall – Ayuntamiento- 市政厅 (sizen ting)- Rathaus
  • Theater- Teatro- 剧院 (juyuan)- Theater
  • Banquet hall- Sala de banquetes- 宴会厅 (yanhui ting)- Festsaal
  • Independence – Independencia- 独立(duli)- Unabhängigkeit
  • Party – Fiesta- 派对 (paidui)- Feier
  • Elegant – Elegante- 再见(zaijian)- Elegant

After having dinner, we took several pictures at different places of the city hall and also at the photocall they had installed for TAMK, UTA and TUT students.

Once the party was over, it was time to say goodbye, and Loy gave each of us a Malaysian keychain as a farewell gift.

I really liked the Each One Teach one course, because in addition to meeting great people from different countries, and knowing more about their culture and their language, in each meeting we did many different funny activities, although the worst part is that I’m going to miss a lot all of the members of my group. It was a pleasure to meet all of you! Who knows, maybe we will see each other in the future in each other’s country!