Tag Archives: verbs

Consonant gradation for verbs

Today’s (8th October 2018) meeting was all about grammar.

Unfortunately, everyone had quite a busy schedule, so we decided to meet between our lectures at TAMK.

We focused mainly on the conjugation of verbs and therefore on the consonant gradation of Finnish verbs. When conjugating verbs, you also need to think of consonant gradation. Each verb type has its own rules. Of course, we also covered some German verbs which we found useful to know. It was interesting to see that the entire group seem to have at least a little fun while doing grammar (it’s obviously necessary to know some basic grammar, but it can also be enjoyable) – especially if you found some rules and repetition in different words/verbs.

I already know quite a lot verbs, especially the basics:  kirjoittaa, nukua, lukea, puhua, tehdä, käyttää, myydä, ostaa, oddotta, olla, opiskella, syödä, juosta, juoda, mennä, tulla, istua, asua, kysyä, katsoa, sanoa

Writing them down here makes me extra aware of how many verbs I already know by heart! That’s amazing! The easiest way for me to learn them is to remember to which verb-type they belong.

For example, the most common is Type 1, which ends with a vocal + ä/a (asua, istua, sanoa, kysyä …) this type is probably the easiest to conjugate since you only cut of the ä/a and add the ending of the person

asua → asu

asun / asut / hän asuu / me asumme / te asutte / he asuvat

It’s easy like that! I wish everything of the Finnish grammar would stick in my head like that, but it’s still a long way to go. Anyway, even baby-steps will get me to a good level of Finnish in the future! 🙂

Deutsche Sprache, schwere Sprache.

German is hard. Our 4th meeting was once again at TAMK and after a discussion on the differences between English and Scottish humour Alex taught me the endings of verb for example;

To Drink – trinken

Ich trinke

Du trinkst

Ihr/Er/Sie/Es trinkt

Wir/Sie trinken

We also covered, to read and to write. I have a feeling that Alex will be testing me on these the next time we meet and then introduce verbs that don’t follow the pattern. This is something that we don’t really have in English I drink, you drink, he drinks she drinks, we drink, they drink. The only addition is the ‘s’ on he and she. What usually changes is the tense present tense- I am drinking. Past tense- I went for a drink/ I drank. Future tense I am going to drink. However I have some familiarity with verb endings in French so was aware of their existence.

According to Duolingo I am now 8% fluent in German. I hope by the end of the term I’ll be at least a quarter of the way there and be able to have a short conversation with Alex. The people in my accommodation are very helpful and let me practice with them as well.

27/09/2016 – 3st meeting Hungarian/French

During this meeting, I just saw Tamás in a café for 1 hour and a half, in the center of Tampere.

We talked about how to order something in a bar; for example how to order drinks and food. In fact, Tamás would like to work in a bar or a restaurant in the future so he wants to practice as much as he can. We built a whole conversation between customers of a restaurant and the waiter. Which questions the waiter should ask pose and the use of good sentences. Tamás is really good in French and he always tries to do his best. He learns very quickly!

Moreover, I learnt a lot of new words today!

  • Shop: Bolt
  • Car: Autó
  • Bicycle: Bicikli
  • Boat, ship: Hajó
  • Train: Vonat
  • Letter: Levél
  • Cellphone: Mobil
  • Market: Piac
  • Post office: Posta
  • Police: Rendőrségi
  • Fire station: Tűzoltóság
  • Ambulance: Mentő
  • Hospital: Kórház

 

And I also learnt two news verbs in Hungarian:

TO DO: CSINAL

  • én csinalok
  • te csinalsz
  • ő csinal
  • mi csinalunk
  • ti csinaltok
  • ők csinalnak

TO CALL: HIV

  • én hivek
  • te hivsz
  • ő hiv
  • mi hivünk
  • ti hivtek
  • ők hivnek

’Az èn nevem Ariane’: My name is Ariane.

More Dutch basics!

eoto1

Fourth meeting took again place at Y-campus. Bryan thought me more basic Dutch like numbers, colours, some verbs and personal pronouns. He had again made nice learning sheets for me. 🙂

We also talked about Belgian towns and cities, which ones I should visit when going to Amsterdam for exchange and of course travelling while in there. Seems like everything is right next to each other. So I will deffo visit those recommended places. I also told Bryan that I’m a big fan of films and rock music too, so he gave me few names to listen to as well as some films that he thought are good to watch.

eoto2

I’ve had a go with the recommended music and I quite like this band called Gorki. I don’t really understand anything yet, obviously but at least my ears get used to Dutch language. 🙂

And here’s also nice video from them with subtitles:

Spanish Class and Korean alphabet

Our second meeting was a Spanish/ Korean class with Haley.

First Haley and I went to dinner to the Italian restaurant, Napoli  in downtown of Tampere, in order to meet each other better. We were talking about our experience in Tampere, and also we decided the objectives that we will want to achieve in this Spanish lessons.

Went we finished the dinner we went to Haley’s resident, TOAS city, and there we started our Spanish class.

First of all, I tried to explain to Haley how to pronounce Spanish, I explained that my language only has 5 vowels (A, E, I, O, U) and the pronunciation of each one is always the same. Then I wrote different and easy sentences like Cómo estas? (How are you), Hola, me llamo Haley (Hello, My name is Haley)…  And I taught how to read Spanish sentences, because the sounds in Spanish are always the same ones, and are really easy to read them.

The most difficult part to teach was the conjugation of the verbs, because in Spanish we change the verb according with the time tens  (Future, present…)  and the person (first , second or thirst person and singular or plural) , so is not the same say  I read a book ( Yo leo un libro) than You read a book (Tu lees un libro).

Moreover, I taught to Haley the different between the verbs Estar and Ser, because in English both verbs have the  same meaning, verb TO BE. For example the verb Estar is related with the feelings and particular situations like Yo estoy cansado (I’m tired) or Yo estoy en la cocina (I’m in the kitchen) and we use the verb Ser when we talk about general or permanent situations like You soy alto (I’m tall) or Tu eres guapa (You are pretty).

Finally I explained how to count in Spanish, but was a little bit difficult to understand for Haley so we decided to do the numbers again in the future.

When we finish the Spanish class we start our Korean Class, Haley explain me the Korean alphabet, she wrote me all the alphabet and explain how to combine them. And the beginning was hard because this alphabet is completely different with English one, but finally I was able to make easy works and sentences, like our names.

 

First meeting! Korean class at UTA!

Our first meeting, we met at Cafe Europa to explain the objectives and expectation of each member of the group in order to establish a learning program for the group.

After that we went to learn Korean! We went to a Korean Class that is organized by Korean exchange students at UTA University.

In that class, we were different exchanges student from around the world, and we were separated in small groups of 10, 5 Koreans and 5 exchanges students in order that each Korean helped one of us to learn the correct pronunciation of the Korean verbs.This class was really interesting for me, because I had the opportunity to learn the essential Korean verbs with different people that are trying to learn Korean too. 

The aim of this class was the essential verbs, we learned the pronunciation of each one and also we tried to make a few sentences. Yeaeun was helping me and Haley was helping Essi.

Some of the verbs that we learned:

  • 할 (to do)
  • 먹다 (to eat)
  • (마시다 (to drink)
  • 가다  (to go)

Also we learned different useful words like beer (맥주), cat (고양이) or home (홈).

I also learned that Korean is a very polite language, they have different speech levels according to the confidence that they have with each person. We learn the polite form (the most used form) and to do this form we have to add 요 (the pronunciation is like “yo”) at the end of the verb or phase.

Our first meeting was really great, because we learned a lot of new staff and also I had the opportunity to meet better the members of my group.

Our next meeting we going to learn Finnish and  do some baking in Essi’s house!

 

Practising verbs

For the third time I met Sanne in Tamk, and we try to improve our grammars knoledges teaching each other something about the most important part of any sentence: the verb!

The first thing was to learn how to say personal pronouns. we started from Dutch, but here I will report also the italian version all together to make it more clear.

I                               ik                                                        io

you                         je / jij / u (formal version)       tu

he/ she / it           hij / zij / het                                  lui / lei / egli (generic, no neutral form)

we                           wij / we                                           noi

you                         jullie                                                 voi

they                        zij                                                      essi / loro

While I was teaching the Italian forms to Sanne I suddenly realized that in formal situation we can use both “lei” (3rd person female), “voi” (2nd pers. plur.) or “loro” (3rd pers. plur.). This varies according to wrhich region of the Italian speaker belongs to, the standard version is the use of “lei”.If the person is very important (and a little bit arrogant maybe) can even use pluralis maiestatis (latin expression) to refer to himself!

The we moved to verbs. Dutch has only one scheme for the conjugation of the verbs (and quite easy for me actually), in which the first person is the root of the verb, second and third persons singular add -t and all the plural forms add -en. I learnt also the main verbs to be (zijn) and to have (hebben).

Unfortunately for Sanne the conjugation of italian verbs is much more complicated. It has 3 different schemes according to the termination of the infinitive form of the verb, and every form is different from the others. So there are many differences between to love (amare), to believe (credere) and to hear (sentire) The verbs to be (essere) and to have (avere) are so irregular that they need their schemes. Poor Sanne!

Carlo Soregotti

Successful teaching session!

A while after our first meeting, we decided to go straight to the point this time. We met at City Toas in the morning, sat down and started work on Spanish verbs.
I had so much fun teaching different verbs and its past tenses, I don’t know why but it was so enjoyable! I have to say that I realized that Spanish is harder than I thought, I mean, when it comes to the use of verbs it gets very confusing. For example, the verb “ser”

Present
yo soy            nos. somos
tú eres           vos. sois
él es                ellos son

Past
yo fui              nos. fuimos
tú fuiste        vos. fuisteis
él fue              ellos fueron

This verb is obviously irregular and accordingly hard to remember, but Melanie knows how to handle that 😀
And we also had some problem to find a word to say “conjugar” in english, it might be conjugate… but it just doesn’t sound too good.

Anyway, I enjoyed this session very much and I’m looking forward to the next one!