All posts by Niina Lahti

German – Finnish / The 4th Meeting

14th of November 2020 / 4th Meeting

This time we met at Cafe Katto which is a nice little top floor cafe located in the Finlayson area. We chatted about school and life in general and then started our language studies. First, we read through the previous word exercises and started to study some basic verb conjugations. I explained the importance of pronouncing the double vowels and consonants in Finnish as if that gets missed, many words might change their meaning. I showed some examples of it (kissa: a cat, kisa: a race/competition, etc.). We also told each other some more rare but quite possible terrible mistakes you can make with both languages if you are not careful. xD Some more useful everyday sentences were also taught again.

The cafe had an outside rooftop terrace where we went to watch the city before it got completely dark. It was a nice view of the city and fortunately, the weather was not that cold yet. There was some curious group of people walking around the edges of the rooftop. It turns out that if you wanted to, you could book a trip to walk around the top of the whole building wearing safety ropes. This time we were satisfied just by taking some photos of the view at the terrace. ;D

In the end, Chris showed me some popular German music and I made him listen to some Finnish music too. We wondered if there were some good TV-series which could be helpful in learning the languages and decided to search for those options for the next meeting. I had never been to that cafe before so it was a nice new experience, and I will surely revisit the place some time again. 😀

View of the city from Cafe Katto rooftop terrace.

German – Finnish / The 3rd Meeting

4th of November 2020 / 3rd Meeting

For this meeting, we decided to go to Vapriikki Museum. Vapriikki is a museum center that hosts many exhibitions each year with varied themes, including history, technology, and natural sciences.

We spent most of the time there in the Finnish Museum of Games which showcases the Finnish gaming culture and tells the story of how digital gaming in Finland started and developed over the years. You can also play their games from different time periods and we tried out some childhood classics. We knew most of the popular ones but there were also quite many old games which were new to me. There were some unknown and unique Finnish games for Chris as well. In addition to digital games, the museum had an arcade where you can try coin-operated games starting from the 1970s. I think we went through all of them but my own favorite was the old Nopeustesti (The Speed Test) in the corner of one collider. 😀 The museum shows some history of Finnish board games too. That was interesting to see as the boards usually represented outdated maps and old frontiers of European countries.

We also checked the Rupriikki Media Museum’s new exhibition. It showed historical communication technologies that were used at Tampere city in the past. It really highlighted the advancement and significance of information networks in today’s world. We also visited the Mineral Museum and had coffee at the Museum’s Cafe in the end. The time went fast and it was an interesting cultural and historical experience for both of us. 

 

German – Finnish / The second meeting.

24th October 2020 / 2nd meeting

This time I met Chris at his apartment, and we did a little walk by the lake Näsijärvi and went for a  snack at Pella’s cafe. During the meeting, we were able to get through quite many words and sentences in German and Finnish. We were not only talking a lot but also used a Word document where we wrote the numbers, the weekdays, some colors, and useful sentences. We read them through and discussed the pronunciation of the letters. 

For me, the pronunciation part is tricky as the German language has some sounds that do not exist in Finnish (like the German ’r’) or in any other language I’ve studied before. It was a little mind-blowing to find out there are at least three different ways to pronounce the letter ‘s’ in the German language. There seem to be quite many changes in the pronunciation of the letters with different words, so I’m curious to understand more about that in the future. I’m glad that some words seem to resemble English (for example the days of the week) because that helps me to remember them. 

Chris did an excellent job pronouncing those Finnish words we went through. Luckily it is often said that Finnish is not the hardest language to read or write, as every written letter is always pronounced with the same sound and each sound is written with the same letter. Despite that, long vowels and double consonants can make it a bit difficult as mistaking them can easily turn into misunderstandings, but I will dive more into that next time.😉

On top of the language studies, we talked about some history and traditional events from both of the countries. We also discussed more of our studies, work experiences, and interests in the Interactive Media study field. Later that evening we went to hang out with some of his friends, and all I can say is that it was a really fun and eventful day! I look forward to the next meeting and to learn more! 😀

German – Finnish / The first meeting

Wednesday 7th October 2020 / The first meeting.

Chris and I decided to have our first EOTO-course meeting at a cafe. My sister came too as she wanted from the beginning to occasionally join the studying. First, we introduced ourselves and talked about some basic background information to get to know each other. Chris is an exchange student from Germany who quite recently arrived here in Tampere, so it was interesting to hear his first impressions about Finland and this city. He had already picked up some common words in Finnish but had not studied the language. My level in German was the same as I have visited Germany once and got some friends from there but never studied the language before. 

We started from the basics and went through some greetings and other common words and phrases. Even though Finnish and German are very different  we found some similarities between them – for example, the use of alphabets is more similar than I expected as in German they also use the letters ö and ä. Also in both languages people like making ridiculously long words by combining them together. Besides studying the language there was some discussion about Finnish and German culture and the stereotypes too. The meeting went quickly and was really nice! I look forward to getting to know each other better and learning more German in the future. 😀