All posts by Luiza de Oliveira Vago

Second Meeting

In our second meeting, Emilia and I spent 3 lovely hours together, in which we were able to learn the numbers from 1 to 20 in our languages. I believe it was a bit easier for me since I’ve been learning Finnish for a while now, but I never feel really safe to try to speak with random people, so to practice with her gives me more confidence.

Emilia was also checking the materials I have from my Finnish class to check what I was studying and we decided that we can use those materials and also translate to Portuguese, so in that way we are learning the same topics together. 

It was really nice to have her at my place. We tried to play with my kitten but I guess in this task we failed. At least the numbers in Finnish-Portuguese were a success! And of course, also in English, since that’s the common language between us. It is interesting how we can improve our English skills along the way, for example using the translator when we don’t know what we are really trying to say and we need to use the 3 languages. The translator is also a good tool because it gives us many different meanings of only one word and we are able to talk about all the meetings. Emilia also helped me to book a massage and the website was entirely in Finnish, so she was translating step by step, which is good because I can get some different vocabulary from that.

I explained to Emilia that the number 4 is written “quatro”, and the word room is “quarto” and this can be a bit tricky since the position of the T and R is the only thing changing (and the meaning, of course!). But, when we say “you are in 4th place of the competition”, for example, 4th = quarto. It’s clear – I guess – the meaning is different although the way to write the words is the same.

Below you can see números or numerot – in Portuguese and in Finnish – that we did together:

1 – yksi – um

2 – kaksi – dois

3 – kolme – três

4 – neljä – quatro

5 – viisi – cinco

6 – kuusi – seis

7 – seitsemän – sete

8 – kahdeksan – oito

9 – yhdeksän – nove

10 – kymmenen – dez

11 – yksitoista – onze

12 – kaksitoista – doze

13 – kolmetoista – treze

14 – neljätoista – quatorze

15 – viisitoista – quinze

16 – kuusitoista – dezesseis

17 – seitsemäntoista – dezessete

18 – kahdeksantoista – dezoito 

19 – yhdeksantoista – dezenove

20 –  kaksikymmentä – vinte

 

Our First Meeting

Emilia and I met at Café Puisto, in which we chatted about all kinds of topics someone can think of, such as our personal histories, Brazilian and Finnish culture, things we like to do, etc. It was a really nice period of 3 hours in which we were able to get to know each other, plan our meetings and learn.

The exchange of knowledge is clear when we are able to be with a native and understand the culture and language of a country. From funny words to greetings, we learnt a bit more of what we already knew – or thought we did – together. As we are not Linguistic experts, sometimes it is not that easy to explain why we use words the way we do in our own Languages. 

Emilia was interested in how in Portuguese we differentiate feminine and masculine words while I was showing her the greetings “bom diagood morning” and “boa noitegood night”, since dia is a masculine word and noite is a feminine word, so the “good” part changes because of that. I remember that my explanation was something like: “Some Latin speaker one day, said that X word is feminine and Z a masculine word, and they are classified that way till nowadays”. Can’t really say if that was right, but I know that it was humans themselves who chose the word tree for the representation of what we call a tree today, wasn’t it? 

Some things are not easy to explain since we don’t pay too much attention to it when we are speaking our mother tongue, it just comes naturally. Overall, it has been a great experience to learn with Emilia, she is extremely lovely, open to help me with my Finnish skills, to learn my language (which makes me super happy!) and I am enjoying this experience.

Our First Meeting

Emilia and I met at Café Puisto, in which we chatted about all kinds of topics someone can think of, such as our personal histories, Brazilian and Finnish culture, things we like to do, etc. It was a really nice period of 3 hours in which we were able to get to know each other, plan our meetings and learn.

The exchange of knowledge is clear when we are able to be with a native and understand the culture and language of a country. From funny words to greetings, we learnt a bit more of what we already knew – or thought we did – together. As we are not Linguistic experts, sometimes it is not that easy to explain why we use words the way we do in our own Languages. 

Emilia was interested in how in Portuguese we differentiate feminine and masculine words while I was showing her the greetings “bom diagood morning” and “boa noitegood night”, since dia is a masculine word and noite is a feminine word, so the “good” part changes because of that. I remember that my explanation was something like: “Some Latin speaker one day, said that X word is feminine and Z a masculine word, and they are classified that way till nowadays”. Can’t really say if that was right, but I know that it was humans themselves who chose the word tree for the representation of what we call a tree today, wasn’t it? 

Some things are not easy to explain since we don’t pay too much attention to it when we are speaking our mother tongue, it just comes naturally. Overall, it has been a great experience to learn with Emilia, she is extremely lovely, open to help me with my Finnish skills, to learn my language (which makes me super happy!) and I am enjoying this experience.