Tag Archives: Finland

Let’s talk about education

Our fourth meeting was about the education systems. We met this time, how appropriate, at the university.

My expectations were that the Finnish and Dutch education system are pretty similar, but that was not the case. It’s totally different from each other.

The Finnish school system starts at age 6. Kids will start preschool. At age 7, kids will go to basic education. The basic educations has 9, sometimes 10 years. The 10th year is for those who need a little bit more time and for those who can’t decide what to do next. Most pupils are around 15 or 16 when they finish basic education.

After basic education, pupils can choose between Upper secondary school and Vocational school.

Upper secondary school

This is kind of similar to high school. This will take 3 years, and this is particularly theoretical education. Pupils will get different kinds of subjects and after Upper secondary school, Pupils can to vocational school, university of applied sciences or university.

Vocational school

Vocational school is a school for pupils who already kind of know what they want to become. This is particularly practical education, you can study for cook for example. This will take 3 years and after vocational school, pupils can look for a job and gain work experience, do another vocational qualification, go to university of applied sciences or go to university.

University of applied sciences

Most pupils are around 18 or 19 years old when they finish upper secondary school or vocational school. One of their options is going to the university of applied sciences. This will take 4 years and after finishing the university of applied sciences, you will get a Bachelor’s degree.  With a Bachelor degree and work experience, it’s possible to go for a Master’s degree.

University

The other option is going to the university. This will take 5 years. After the 3rd year, students will have their Bachelor degree. After the 5th year the students will get their Master’s degree. After getting a Master’s degree it’s possible to get a licentiate and a doctor’s degree.

 

A fun fact about the school system in Finland are the graduation caps. After graduating Upper secondary school, Finnish students will get a graduation cap.

Differences

Like I already said before, the Finnish education system differs a lot from the Dutch system. In the Netherlands, children will start school when they are 4 years old. They will start high school when they are about 12 years old.

Another really big difference between the systems is the fact that in the Netherlands, after elementary school, pupils will get classified on level. The level decides to what school they will go after high school.

It was really interesting to see the 2 education systems next to each other and it was also interesting that the systems differ a lot from each other. After seeing them next to each other I can’t say which system I think it’s better, because they both got their pro’s and con’s.

 

6th meeting: A quick visit to Vapriikki

For our sixth meeting we decided to see each other in Vapriikki to go to the National History Museum, since we had been talking about moose and deer flies during our last meeting. So, why only to talk, since you are also able to see! As we decided to go on Friday after 17pm, we did not have to pay for the fee, which was very convenient.

As it was about the Finnish nature and animals, I tried to explain Fruzsi and Boti some interesting facts about them. However, during our conversations I realized that Hungary is rather similar to Finland, when it comes to nature and animals. Not so many differences there. However, Fruzsi and Boti told me about some flying insects that do glow while flying, and I don’t think we have such.

For me the biggest outcome of this meeting was to have a nice continuum for the last meeting. To take one thing from a level of words a step up to something concrete. I personally love it when one thing leads to another. Also, since I last time got so exited about the image of a rural Hungarian village with interesting traditional events, I would now very much like to visit one, especially, if they have flying and glowing insects.

The picture above is from a movie The Princess and the Frog by Disney.

Food night!

For our second meeting, the theme was food. We decided to cook some food together. I’m not a really good cook, so I was glad Elisa wrote down two reci

pes.

The first thing we made was makaronilaatikko, macaroni casserole or macaroni ovenschotel.

Things you need:

Finnish English Dutch
5 dl makaronia 5 dl macaroni 5 dl macaroni
1 kpl sipulia 1 pcs onion 1 ui
1 rkl rypsiöljyä 1 tbsp rapeseed oil 1 el koolzaad olie
400 g jauhelihaa 400 g minced meat 400 gr gehakt
2 kpl kananmunaa 2 pcs eggs 2  eieren
5 dl maitoa 5 dl milk 500 ml melk
½ tl suolaa ½ tsp salt ½ tl zout
¼ tl mustapippuria ¼ tsp black pepper ¼ tl zwarte peper

 

What to do:

  1. Keitö makaronit.
  2. Kuori ja pilko sipuli.
  3. Kuullota sipulit ölyssä.
  4. Paista jauheliha.
  5. Lisää sipuli jauhelihan joukkoon.
  6. Sekoita jauheliha – sipuli seos makaronien joukkoon.
  7. Vatkaa kananmunat.
  8. Lisää mausteet ja maito kanonmunien joukkoon.
  9. Kaada munamaito vuokaan.
  10. Paista 175 °C noin tunti.

 

  1. Cook the macaroni.
  2. Peel and cut the onion.
  3. Fry the onions in the oil.
  4. Fry the minced meat.
  5. Add the onions to the minced meat.
  6. Mix it with the macaroni.
  7. Scramble the eggs.
  8. Add spices and milk to the eggs.
  9. Pour the eggmilk to the pan.
  10. Cook at 175 °C for about an hour.

 

  1. Kook de macaroni.
  2. Pel en snij de ui.
  3. Braad de ui in de olie.
  4. Braad het gehakt.
  5. Voeg de uien toe aan het gehakt.
  6. Mix dit met de macaroni.
  7. Roer de eieren door elkaar.
  8. Voeg de specerijen en de melk toe aan de eieren.
  9. Giet het eiermelk in de pan.
  10. Bak het in de oven op 175 °C voor ongeveer een uur.

 

 

The second recipe is Mustikkapiirakka (it’s easier to bake than to pronounce)/blueberry pie/bosbessen tart.

Things you need for the pohja/dough/deeg:

Finnish English Dutch
150 g voita 150 g butter 150 gr boter
1,5 dl sokeria 1,5 dl sugar 1,5 dl suiker
1 kananmuna 1 egg 1 ei
3 dl vehnäjauhpja 3 dl flour 3 dl bloem
1 tl vaniliinisokeria 1 tbs vanilla sugar 1 el vanilla suiker
1 tl leivinjauhetta 1 tbs baking powder 1 el bakpoeder
400 g mustikoita 400 g blueberries 400 gr bosbessen

 

Things you need for the murutaikina/short pastry/zanddeeg:

Finnish English Dutch
50 g voita 50 g butter 50 gr boter
0,5 dl sokeria 0,5 dl sugar 0,5 dl suiker
1 dl vehnäjauhoja 1 dl flour 1 dl bloem

 

What to do:

  1. Sekoita sokeri ja pehmeä voi.
  2. Lisää muut aineet ja sekoita tasaiseksi.
  3. Levitä taikina vuokaan.
  4. Kaada mustikat vuokaan tasaiesti.
  5. Valmista murutaikina ja levitä se mustikoiden päälle.
  6. Paista 200 °C noin 30 minuuttia.
  7. Tarjoile jäätelön kahssa.

 

  1. Mix sugar and softened butter.
  2. Add the rest of the ingredients and mix evenly.
  3. Spread the dough into the pan.
  4. Pour the blueberries evenly into the pan.
  5. Mix together the short pastry ingredients, and spread it on the blueberries.
  6. Cook at 200 °C fora bout 30 minutes.
  7. Serve with ice cream.

 

  1. Mix de suiker met de zachte boter.
  2. Voeg de rest van de ingrediënten toe en mix tot een glad geheel.
  3. Leg het deeg in het bakblik.
  4. Giet de bosbessen in het bakblik.
  5. Mix de ingrediënten voor het zanddeeg en spreid dit over de bosbessen.
  6. Bak op 200 °C voor ongeveer 30 minuten.
  7. Serveer met ijs.

 

It was a really fun and delicious evening! My favorite was the blueberry pie, it was amazing, especially with the ice cream. If you have free time, you should definitely try to make it!

4th meeting: ABC and AA’BC

.

This time around we did teach each other our alphabets.  To me this was rather interesting as I was thinking of using the Hungarian alphabets for an art project later on.

However, our first realization was that in the Hungarian alphabet there are a way more letters than in the Finnish alphabet. We counted that in total Hungarians have 44 letters and we Finns 29. This was partly explained so that in Hungary they don’t really use letter

Y,

but they combine it with other letters to form such letters as

GY, LY, NY and TY.

In the Hungarian language they also have such combined letters as

DZ, DZS, SZ and ZS,

which all were really strange to me, who has got used to it that one letter is only one letter – not 3 letters together.  So, to me the Hungarian letters were kind of beyond understanding, which actually made learning them lots of fun.

We also did talk about it that neither in Hungarian language all the letters are equally important, but there are some 4 that they hardly use. Though, on the same time, some letters seems to be almost too popular. If you only look at the alphabet, there are 2 x A, 2 x E, 4 x O and 4 x U, even if you, of course, pronounce them differently.

In Fruzsi’s blog post you are able to see the entire alphabets.

 

 

 

 

 

2nd meeting: Talking about iskola in menza

For our second meeting we met in the canteen of the school to compare educational systems  both in Finland and Hungary.

GRAMMAR

We started our meeting by teaching each other school related words – among others – such as:

koulu/school/iskola

and

ruokala/canteen/menza

However, I guess we all were rather ready to agree that both Finnish and Hungarian are such languages that are quite difficult to people, who don’t speak them as their native language. From this realization we kind of found a topic to our next meeting as we would teach each others our alphabets.

EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM

After learning words related to school we started to explain each other, how the educational system works in our countries. I personally found this rather interesting. Even if systems both in Finland and Hungary are rather similar from kindergarten to university, there are also some differences. The most surprising facts were:

In Hungary high school can last even 5 years whereas in Finland only 3.

*

When taking the final exam of high school, you have a written exam. This is the same in both countries. However, in Hungary you have to take also an oral exam. For this you will be given a list of some 20 questions to which you have to memorize the answers as one of them will be asked from you.

*

In Finnish educational system you have to take an entrance examination of a specific subject you wish to study to get in to a university of university of applied sciences. However, in Hungary, you don’t have to take an entrance examination, but you apply directly with the average of the final exam of high school or technical school.

*

In Hungary there are rather small universities that concentrate only to few subjects whereas in Finland we have universities such as TAMK, in which you are able to study multiple subjects. So, in a Hungarian university there may be 3 000 students while, for instance, in TAMK there are some 9 500.

 

 

Jos metsään haluat mennä nyt niin takuulla yllätyt!

18.9.2017

What a lovely day! My title is from Finnish song for children, it means: “If you want to go to forest, you will be surprised” and we sure did!

Today me and Helena decided to go to see some wonders of Finnish forests: we enjoyed the peace and quietness, ate some berries and tried to find some “suppilovahvero’s” (funnel chanterelles)  and “mustatorvisieni’s” (black trumpets). Today it was more about me teaching her and I taught her what I have learned from my mother as being in forest and picking mushrooms. My mother borrowed me mushroom book so it was lot easier to show them from the book for example how the names are written and also she (and me) could learn if the mushroom is eatable or not. I know a lot of them but there is SO many different mushrooms species and it was impossible to identify them all. We sure tried though!

I knew a few spots in the forest before and we headed to Kaukajärvi (name changed ’cause true mushroomers rarely reveal their spots).  We didn’t have to walk long since we found first mushrooms, the black trumpets! These are very highly valuated and you can buy them from the markets such as Tammelantori for 8-10e/liter… I knew that there might be since I had found them from there before too. Still, it is always a thrill to find some very good eatable mushrooms! They are VERY hard to find and even if you find, you might think that they are just some mushrooms that are gone bad ’cause they look like rotten. We continued further and you can’t believe what we found! There was some funnels and I was very happy to see them, ’cause I thought that it might be still too early for them (they are late autumn fungi). We picked them and not long until we found more, and more and.. Helena found the biggest suppilovahvero’s that I have ever seen! I couldn’t believe it!

 After great success in the forest we went to my place to make some food out of them. I called to my mum and she gave us a good recipe for funnel chanterelle-sauce. We also fried the black trumpets and ate them on the rye bread. The food was great and the company even better! I just love Finnish forests and the treasures they give us!

Tallipiha

Hi!

Our ninth meeting was during Kurumi’s last week in Finland. I tried to thought some “must see” places in Tampere and idyllic Tallipiha was one of them. There was my singing gig and after my concert we enjoyed some drinks and Finnish snacks (Karelian pies and Mariannes) at the terrace of the cafe.

We started to talk about Finnish and Japanese fashion and popular clothing brands. I have been many years a fan of Japanese street fashion so that was quite interesting topic for me. We told Kurumi something about Finnish clothing brands, for example Marimekko.

The funniest thing was that Kurumi had a jacket from popular Japanese clothing brand called “Ehkä Söpö” (that’s Finnish and it means “maybe cute”). Before our meeting Kurumi didn’t know what “Ehkö söpö” means but we told her.

We also talk about popular artists and bands (both in Japanese and Finnish cultures). I learnt many new Japanese bands and artists and Kurumi got many recommendations about popular Finnish bands and artist from us.

That meeting was quite similar to our eighth meeting because we didn’t use any notes. But that meeting was also different from our eight meeting because at this time we taught and learnt mostly cultural things, not language.

Pre-Christmas party

Hi!

In December we had a little pre-Christmas party at my place. We taught Kurumi to bake finnish Christmas pastries. We put plum and apple jams to the pastries. That was the first time Kurumi made christmas pastries and I think she was very good at it!

A month before this meeting Kurumi taught us to make Japanese food. That means both of these meetings  were very similar to each other. Only difference was that a month before this meeting I was learning and now I was teaching. The most challenging thing in teaching was English and especially vocabulary. Luckily Eetu helped me if I didn’t know some words in English!

Of course we had gingerbreads and glogg, too!

When we were finished eating we started to study colors (both in Japanese and Finnish). Before this meeting only color I knew in Japanese was shiro (which means white). During this meeting I learnt eleven more!

With love,

Maria

Christmas concert

Hi!

I had a traditional Finnish Christmas concert in December. I gave a free ticket to my Japanese EOTO-mate Kurumi and she wanted to attend the concert although every song in my concert was performed in Finnish.

The concert was at beautiful “Pikku Palatsi” (that means “little palace”) in Hämeenpuisto. The place look like this (all pics are taken by Kurumi):

That was totally different way to teach Finnish language and culture – I just sang traditional Finnish Christmas carols (for example Varpunen jouluaamuna). After the concert Kurumi said that she hadn’t understood a word but she still enjoyed the concert!

Hiragana and festivals

Hi!

Our second meeting was a late night meeting in Subway (because it was almost only peaceful place which was open).  Kurumi taught us Japanese hiraganas. Eetu was very good at it. As I tried to write with hiragana for the first time in my life we couldn’t help laughing! But I made it to write so many hiraganas and I also learnt to write my name!

We all were very interested in different festivals in each other’s cultures so we started to talk about seasons and festivals. It was very interesting that Japanese New Year is just like our Christmas because New Year is the greatest festival in a year in Japan and it is spent with family. On the other hand, Finnish New Year is very similar to Japanese Christmas because Christmas is usually spent with friends in Japan.

I think it was very nice to study somewhere else than in a classroom or in a library. Late night studying in Subway was something totally different. 😉

With love,

Maria